In and about Drury Lane. about Master Betty. Charles Young and His Times. William Charles Macready. Private Theatricals. the Smell of the Lamps. a Line of French Actresses. Some Eccentricities of the French Stage. Northumberland Volume 1

In and about Drury Lane. about Master Betty. Charles Young and His Times. William Charles Macready. Private Theatricals. the Smell of the Lamps. a Line of French Actresses. Some Eccentricities of the French Stage. Northumberland Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...poet was aroused from his grief by a summons from the king, who, in presence of the sensitive Eacine's bitterest enemy, Louvois, accused him of having robbed and poisoned his late mistress. The accusation was founded on information given by the infamous woman, Voisin, who was a poisoner by passion and profession, and was executed for her devilish practices. The information was found to be utterly false, and Eacine, absolved, soon found consolation and compensation. He became the master of La Champmesle, and taught her how to play the heroines of the dramas which he wrote expressly for her. She, in her turn, became the mistress of her tutor. Of his teaching indeed she stood in little need, except to learn from him his ideas and object, as author of the play. She was not only sublime, but La Champmesle was the first sublime actress that had hitherto appeared on the French stage. Madame de SeVigne wrote to her daughter: --La Champmesle is something so extraordinary that you have never seen anything like it in all your life. One goes to hear the actress, and not the play. I went to see 'Ariadne ' for her sake alone. The piece is inspired: the players execrable. But as soon as La Champmesle comes upon the stage a murmur of gladness runs throughout the house, and the tears of the audience flow at her despair. The magic of the actress lured Madame de Sevigne's son, the young Marquis, from the side of Ninon de l'Enclos. 'He is nothing but a pumpkin fricasseed in snow, ' said the perennial beauty. After the young nobleman thought proper to inform his mother of the interest he took in La Champmesle, Madame de Sevigne was so proud that she wrote and spoke of her son's mistress as her daughter-in-law! To her own daughter she wrote as follows of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236493419
  • 9781236493415