Zoology; A Systematic Account of the General Structure, Habits, Instincts, and Uses of the Principal Families of the Animal Kingdom Volume 2

Zoology; A Systematic Account of the General Structure, Habits, Instincts, and Uses of the Principal Families of the Animal Kingdom Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...Thus, in the Eunice, we find, at the under part, a fleshy tubercle (), furnished with a tuft of bristles, and below it a rudimentary cirrhus, or tendril-like organ (i); whilst the upper part of the appendage is formed by a branchial tuft (f, ), and by a long slender cirrhus (c). This last sometimes exhibits a trace of articulation, as in the Syllis (Fig. 522, a). In other cases, however, these appen Fio. 522.--Sylus Monilaris, with one of its locomotive organs and setigerous appendage attached thereto. dages are only represented by a few short stiff hairs, as in the Earthworm; and in other instances, as the Leech, there is no trace of any members or appendages to the body. The bristly tufts of the Nereidans and their allies are useful to them in various ways; they serve them in part as instruments of attack and defence, the bristles being usually sharp, and sometimes barbed at their extremities, so as to attach themselves with force to soft substances; they assist, also, in their movements over solid surfaces, taking hold, as it were, of the rock on which the animal is crawling, so that the hinder part of the body is prevented from slipping back, when the anterior part is pushed forwards; and they also aid in its movements through the 300 GENERAL CHARACTERS OF ANNELIDA. water, serving in some degree as oars by which it is propelled-. In some instances, indeed, we find the tufts replaced by flattened plates, which are specially adapted for this last purpose. Where there are no locomotive appendages, the extremities of the body are usually furnished with suckers, which give important assistance in locomotion, --as in the well-known Leech. But in one tribe of this class, the animal, in its adult form at least, enjoys very little power of locomotion,show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 178 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236644972
  • 9781236644978