Ziba Foote; And Other Stories, Being True Tales from the Short and Simple Annals of the Poor

Ziba Foote; And Other Stories, Being True Tales from the Short and Simple Annals of the Poor

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1877 edition. Excerpt: ...at the head of her grave, a marble slab with the name "ulia Hand" on it. However happy and hopeful young persons may seem to be while in pursuit of the false and wicked purposes of jealousy and envy against the poor. they are sure to find in the end shame, misery, and death. CHAPTER XIX. Ziba/s Brother. About the year 18-, three young physicians emigrated from the East to the Far West. One settled at Bloomington, the county-seat of Monroe County, Indiana, and one located at Salem, the county-seat of Washington County. The other commenced practicing his profession at Palestine, which was then the county-seat of Lawrence County. The latter was in many respects a remarkable man, and soon rose to distinction in his profession. No physician in the White River country had more experience in the practice of medicine. He was a brother of Ziba Foote, and fully intended some time to remove the latter's remains to Palestine. The country was then new and thinly settled;' and, while it was but a hundred miles or so from Palestine to Foote's Grave Pond, remember, reader, that there were no railroads then to carry men as on the wings of the wind, nor were there any canals or stage-coaches. Men had to travel mostly on horseback, and very often through the woods, without any roads at all. From Palestine, where Dr. Foote lived, to Foote's Grave Pond, there were no roads, and the only way to get there was by a keel boat, down White River. This beautiful stream, a tributary of the Wabash, is formed by two branches, .which unite some miles below Palestine. The whole surface of the country was a mass of rich soil, which produced an immense amount of vegetation, of every sort known in the West. Dr. Foote had romantic...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236839358
  • 9781236839350