Zechariah and His Prophecies, Considered in Relation to Modern Criticism; With a Critical and Grammatical Commentary and New Translation Eight Lecture

Zechariah and His Prophecies, Considered in Relation to Modern Criticism; With a Critical and Grammatical Commentary and New Translation Eight Lecture

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...appears on that occasion to have thought of the close connection between the acts performed before the eyes of the people and the predictions of Zechariah. " These things understood not his disciples at the first, but when Jesus was glorified, then remembered they that those things were written of him, and they had done those things unto him " (John xii. 16). The great result of the advent of the Messiah is stated in the verse following: " And I cut off the chariot from Ephraim and the horse from Jerusalem, and the battle-bow shall be cut off, and he will speak peace to the nations, and his rule shall be from sea to sea, and from the river to the ends of the earth." The reign of the Messiah was to result in a universal spread of peace. But that result was to be brought about in a very singular manner. The Lord would first destroy among his own people the chariots, the horses, and the weapons used in war. Instead of the Messiah arming the people whom he was to deliver with those weapons of war needful for a contest with their foes, this second Joshua, who should ultimately put his people in full possession of their land, and give them rest for ever, was not to call upon an "armed" people "prepared for war" to pass on before him " unto battle " against the enemy (comp. Josh. iv. 12, 13). Not thus was the Messiah to procure rest for his people. On the contrary, he would first break the bow and cut in sunder the spear of Ephraim and Jerusalem, burn their chariots and cut off the horses (Ps. xlvi. 9) of his own people, and then speak peace to the nations against whom he might most justly have carried on an exterminating war. Hengstenberg and Kliefoth, following here the interpretation of Theodoret and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 194 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236488946
  • 9781236488947