Young Folks' Physiology; A Revised Edition of Our Bodies and How We Live. an Elementary Text-Book of Physiology and Hygiene with Special Reference to the Effects of Stimulants and Narcotics on the Human System, for Use in Schools

Young Folks' Physiology; A Revised Edition of Our Bodies and How We Live. an Elementary Text-Book of Physiology and Hygiene with Special Reference to the Effects of Stimulants and Narcotics on the Human System, for Use in Schools

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...and countless other preparations, which people are eager to buy, hoping to get relief from some real or fancied disease. Thousands of tons of opium are smoked and chewed, like tobacco, in distant parts of the world, especially in China, causing great degradation and misery among the people. This habitual use of opium is, however, a common vice everywhere. Over half a million pounds were imported into this country in 1883, and a large proportion of this enormous quantity was consumed by "opium-eaters." Opium leaves its after-effects in dryness of the mouth, thirst, nausea, constipation, and a dull headache. In large doses, there are giddiness and stupor. A person becomes motionless and insensible to outward impressions; he lies quite still, with the eyes shut, and the pupils contracted; and the whole expression of the countenance is that of deep repose. As the poisoning advances, the features become ghastly, the pulse feeble, and the muscles greatly relaxed; and, unless help is procured, death speedily ensues. If the person recovers, the insensibility is succeeded by sleep for one or two days, followed by nausea, vomiting, and loathing of food. Eaten or smoked habitually to satisfy a craving for it, opium makes a living death for its victim. A person may begin in the most innocent way to use a little opium to relieve pain: little by little, the meshes of this fascinating narcotic are woven about him. The opium relieves the suffering, but the worst of it is, a person cannot leave off its use without the greatest effort. A craving is stimulated which no one can realize unless he has once been within the destructive toils of this drug. It is untold misery to quit it, and sure death to keep on using it. This habit of taking opium completely...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123662176X
  • 9781236621764