The Year 1800, or the Sayings and Doings of Our Fathers and Mothers 60 Years Ago; As Recorded in the Newspapers and Other Periodicals

The Year 1800, or the Sayings and Doings of Our Fathers and Mothers 60 Years Ago; As Recorded in the Newspapers and Other Periodicals

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ... was returning to London, near Shooter's Hill, it was attacked by three footpads. The guard being imprudently on the box without his blunderbuss when the coach was stopped, he moved towards the roof of the coach to get it, which the robbers perceiving, discharged at him a pistol containing two balls, both of which entered his body, and wounded him in a dangerous manner. The robbers then secured the blunderbuss, and the passengers were obliged to submit quietly to be robbed of everything of value. The guard was conveyed to Welling, with very little hopes of recovery. (124.) On Sunday morning last the Warrington mail was robbed by a man on foot, about two or three o'clock, between Winwick and Red Bank Hill, who, after a struggle with the post-boy, pulled him off his horse, which the robber then mounted and rode away with the mail towards Winwick Green. The usual reward of 2001. was immediately offered for his apprehension. From the circumstance of a pistol, cap, plate, and feather being found near the spot, it is supposed that the robber belongs to the Queen's own Regiment of Dragoons; it is also supposed he had his own horse near the place, as the post-boy's horse was left at a short distance, and a man of the above description passed through the toll-bar at Lane-head. This is the third time the same mail has been robbed within twelve months. (125.) Some days ago a French priest was attacked by a footpad on the Edgeware Road, who, not content with the few shillings he had about him, insisted on his coat, alleging it was superior to his own; the exchange was no sooner completed than the priest ran, so did the thief, vociferating to him to stop, but in vain, fearing he meant to ill use him. On reaching a public street, the thief gave up the pursuit, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236545338
  • 9781236545336