The World's Wonders as Seen by the Great Tropical and Polar Explorers; Being an Encyclopedia of Exploration, Discovery and Adventure in All Parts of the World

The World's Wonders as Seen by the Great Tropical and Polar Explorers; Being an Encyclopedia of Exploration, Discovery and Adventure in All Parts of the World

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ...and little or no value was placed upon it by the natives. The Arab traders brought with them several slaves with tho expectation of trading them to the Manyuemas for ivory, but the latter would have none but female slaves, which they desired for wives, and refused to receive a mac slave even as a present. This was a sore disappointment to the Arabs, who scarcely knew what to do with their slaves, unless they liberated them. They finally concluded to go further north and try traffic with other natives. Livingstone met with no better success than the Arabs, for with all his persuasion and proffers of presents, he could not hire a canoe, and was forced to abandon his intended exploration of the Lualaba. The forests which lined the road were exceedingly dense, and Livingstone noticed that wherever any clearing had been attempted gigantic grass usurped the place in a very short time; this grass, however, is burned frequently. Large trees do not readily succumb to the fire, but put out new wood below the burnt places. Upon these Livingstone found largo numbers of parrots building their nests, while above, the natives construct straw huts and live secure from the attacks of wild animals. The men make a stair up one hundred and fifty feet by tying climbing plants (called binayoba) around, at about four feet distance, as steps. Near the confluence of the Luamo, men build huts on this same species of tree for safety against the arrows of their enemies. A SINGING FROG AND FISH THAT GIVE MILK. Being defeated in his purposes of exploring the river, Livingstone returned to Bambarre, and there joined the Arabs in a journey to the north. The route lay through a marshy district and so many streams had to be crossed that fever again attacked him, which, aided by a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 222 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 404g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236499204
  • 9781236499202