The Works of the REV. John Witherspoon; To Which Is Prefixed an Account of the Author's Life, in a Sermon Occasioned by His Death Volume 4

The Works of the REV. John Witherspoon; To Which Is Prefixed an Account of the Author's Life, in a Sermon Occasioned by His Death Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1801 edition. Excerpt: ... wanting. There is something in the application and direction of all these accomplishments which judgment must supply, and which neither instruction, example, nor even experience will bestow. It is probable that many would readily grant me (what yet I do not ask, being hardly of the fame opinion) that of all the characters just now mentioned, that of a man of fashion or politeness is the most supersicial, and what may be most easily attained by imitation and habit. Yet even here nothing is more easy than to see the dominion of judgment and good sense, or the prevalence of folly and indiscretion. That want of presence of mind or embarrassment, which is often the effect of modesty or bashfulness; nay, even the errors and blunders which visibly proceed from ignorance and mistake of the reigning mode, are not half so absurd and ridiculous, as the affected airs and misplaced ceremonies of a fop, of which the ladies are always most attentive observers, and to give them their due, generally not incompetent judges. Once more, judgment is an original and radical quality, that is of all others least capable of being communicated by instruction, or even improved or augmented by culture. Memory and imagination are also gifts of nature; but they may be greatly increased, the one by exercise, and the other by indulgence. You may teach a man any thing in the world but prudence, which is the genuine offspring of common sense. It is generally faid that experience teaches fools, but the meaning of the proverb is often mistaken, for it does not signify that experience makes them wise: it signisies that they never are wise at all, put persist in spite of instruction, warning and example, till they seel the effects of their own folly. If a man is born with a fund of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123664056X
  • 9781236640567