The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq., with Notes and Illustrations, by Himself and Others. to Which Are Added, a New Life of the Author, an Estimate of His Poetical Character and Writings, and Occasional Remarks by William Roscoe, Esq Volume 7

The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq., with Notes and Illustrations, by Himself and Others. to Which Are Added, a New Life of the Author, an Estimate of His Poetical Character and Writings, and Occasional Remarks by William Roscoe, Esq Volume 7

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...of it (which I desire you to mak.e) you think as I do, that it is written in the very spirit of the ancients, it 4 Dr. Johnson thought differently about this Tragedy; written evidently and happily in the style and manner of Eschylus; and said, " that it was deficient in both requisites of a true Aristotelic middle. Its intermediate parts have neither cause nor consequence; neither hasten nor retard the catastrophe." To which opinion the judicious Mr. Twining accedes. What Dr. Warburton said of it is wonderfully ridiculous; that Milton " chose the subject for the sake of the satire on bad wives;" and that the subjects of this tragedy, and Paradise Lost, were not very different, " the fall of two heroes by a woman." Milton, in this drama, has given an example of every species of measure which the English language is capable of exhibiting; not only in the Choruses, but in the dialogue part. The chief parts of the Dialogue (though there is a great variety of measure in the Choruses of the Greek Tragedies) are in Iambic verse. I recollect but three places in which Hexameter verses are introduced in the Greek Tragedies, once in the Trachinite, once in the Philoctetes of Sophocles, and once in the Troadet of Euripides. Voltaire wrote an opera on this subject of Samson, 1732, which was set to music by Rameau, but was never performed. He has inserted Choruses to Venus and Adonis; and the piece finishes by introducing Samson, actually pulling down the Temple, on the stage, and crushing all the assembly, which Milton has flung into so fine a narration; and the opera is ended by Samson's saying, " J'ai repare ma honte, et j'expire en vainqueur." And yet this was the man that dared to deride the irregularities of Shakespeare.--Warton. 6 What are we to think...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 218g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236658086
  • 9781236658081