The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq., with Notes and Illustrations, by Himself and Others. to Which Are Added, a New Life of the Author, an Estimate of His Poetical Character and Writings, and Occasional Remarks by William Roscoe, Esq Volume 1

The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq., with Notes and Illustrations, by Himself and Others. to Which Are Added, a New Life of the Author, an Estimate of His Poetical Character and Writings, and Occasional Remarks by William Roscoe, Esq Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...them, to add to the new volume. I have reason to choose the method you mention of mixing the several verses, and I hope thereby, among the bad critics, to be entitled to more merit than is my due." In the beginning of March, 1726-79, Pope announces to Swift the completion of the work: " Our Miscellany is now quite printed. I am prodigiously pleased with this joint volume, in which, methinks, we look like friends, side by side, serious and merry by turns, conversing interchangeably, and walking down, hand in hand, to posterity; not in the stiff forms of learned authors, flattering each other and setting the rest of mankind at nought, but in a free, unimportant, natural, easy manner, diverting others, just as we diverted ourselves. The third volume consists of verses, but I would choose to print none but such as have some peculiarity, and may be distinguished for ours from other writers. There is no end of making books, Solomon said; and above all, of making miscellanies, which all men can make. For unless there be a character in every piece like the mark of the elect, I should not care to be one of the twelve thousand signed." In the beginning of September, 1726, Pope met with an accident which had nearly proved fatal to him. Returning home at night from Lord Bolingbroke's at Dawley, in his lordship's coach and four, he was overturned near Whitton, about a mile from Twickenham, in a little river, where a bridge had lately been broken down, and a block of timber obstructed the road. At the moment the accident happened, the glasses of the coach were up, and he was himself asleep, so that before he was aware, he was up to the knots of his periwiy in water. He endeavoured, but without effect, to let down the glasses, and it was some time before the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 160 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236659376
  • 9781236659378