Words for a Small Planet

Words for a Small Planet : Ecocritical Views

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Description

Scholars have begun critically assessing the relationship of modern environmental science, including the study of ecology, to the creation and study of art and culture. In this volume, the voices come from around the globe-some tentative in the stirring of conscious entwinement, other voices, strident and forthright, foresee a grim future, for the planet, for our humanity, as our impositions and consumptions have made monsters of us all and stripped us of our essence, the heart of what it is to be human.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 238 pages
  • 154.94 x 231.14 x 10.16mm | 498.95g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • 0739171585
  • 9780739171585

Review quote

Words for a Small Planet is an important book that makes connections between traditional forms of eco-criticism and emerging, non-Western settings, texts, and frameworks. Anyone who studies and writes about literature and environment in the 21st Century needs to add this book to their collection! -- Stephen P. Depoe, professor and head, Department of Communication, University of Cincinnatishow more

About Nanette Norris

Nanette Norris is Assistant Professor of English at Royal Military College Saint-Jean, where she teaches undergraduate courses in twentieth century literature. Her work has appeared in Images of the Child, ed. Harry Eiss (Bowling Green, 1994), Engaging the Enemy: Canada in the 1940s, ed. Andrew Hiscock and Muriel Chamberlain (Dinefwr Press, 2006), Paris in American Literatures, ed. Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera and Vamsi Koneru, (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012), C.S.Lewis: The Chronicles of Narnia Casebook, ed. Lance E. Weldy and Michelle Abate, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), and The D.H. Lawrence Review, among others. She is the editor of Unionist Popular Culture and Rolls of Honour in the North of Ireland During the First World War: A Collection of Diverse Essays in Popular Culture (Edwin Mellen, 2012). Words for a Small Planet is the fulfillment of a life-long desire to be involved in the study of ecology and ecosystems, and is the outcome of a visit to Saudi Arabia where she saw the Arab Spring in progress, not only across the bridge in Bahrain, but in the homes and hearts of Saudi women: she is proud to bring her editing and collecting skills to the project of giving voice to these and other cultures in the ecosystem called Earth.show more

Table of contents

Preface Annie Merrill Ingram Introduction: Ecocritical Spring and Evolutionary Discourse Andrew Belyea and Nanette Norris Chapter 1: Imaginary Representations and Cultural Performances Of Ecocriticism Eduardo Barros-Grela Chapter 2: Ecological Narrative or Imperial Exploitation: What's the "Monster" in Animal Planet's River Monsters? Christopher Justice Chapter 3: The Representation of Nature: An Ecocritical Reading of Juan Leon Mera's Cumanda Frederico A. Chalupa Chapter 4: Nature Versus War in Letters from the Front, 1914-1918 Sylvie Housiel Chapter 5: A Passage to India: An Ecocritical Reading Yomna Al-Abdulkareem Chapter 6: Nature, Women, and the Ecotext: Self-Discovery in Emily Nasrallah's Short Stories "The Cocoon" and "The Butterfly" Iman A. Hanafy Chapter 7: Jerusalem in the poetry of Tamim El-Barghouti and Yehuda Amichai Hessa Al-Kahlan Chapter 8: Omumu Concept of Begetting: A Pro-Feminist Lesson from Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart Chinyere Okafor Chapter 9: The Legacy of the American War in Vietnam: Tim O'Brien's "Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong" Nanette Norris Chapter 10: National Narrative as Wilderness: An Ecocritical Interpretation of Civilizacion y barbarie in Modern Argentine Literature Anne E. Hiller Chapter 11: Unnatural Appetites and the Case of the Cannibal in Korean Cinema Colette Balmain Chapter 12: Is 'Eco' Enough?: Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake, Wayland Drew's The Erthring Cycle, and Evolutionary Fiction Andrew Belyeashow more