The Wonders of Science; Or, Young Humphry Davy (the Cornish Apothecary's Boy, Who Taught Himself Natural Philosophy and Eventually Became President of the Royal Society). the Life of a Wonderful Boy, Written for Boys

The Wonders of Science; Or, Young Humphry Davy (the Cornish Apothecary's Boy, Who Taught Himself Natural Philosophy and Eventually Became President of the Royal Society). the Life of a Wonderful Boy, Written for Boys

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ..."give off heat as they pass from a liquid to a solid form? And is solidification, therefore, a heating process to surrounding bodies, in the same manner as liquefaction (from the absorption of heat at such times) is a cooling one?" ' The youth had heard that, if a strong solution of Glauber's salts be poured, while hot, into a flask, and corked tightly down, it will remain liquid when cold, and that on removing the cork it will immediately-shoot into a fibrous mass of' crystals. He wished to see, therefore, whether, in the act of solidification, heat is evolved from such a solution. Humphry Was not long in preparing the requisites for the experiment, and was then delighted to find, as he watched the crystals, immediately that he withdrew the cork, dart from the surface downwards, the temperature of the substance became so much increased, that the bottle which contained it grew sensibly warm in his hand, though it was perfectly cold before. Now the lad knew, that in making the solution he had added 2 ounces of water to 3 ounces of the salts, and as the whole of this became solidified on opening the bottle, it was clear that the elevation of temperature arose principally from the solidgfication of the water in the crystalline mass. Next Humphry added a saturated solution of tartaric acid to some strong liquid ammonia, and found, immediately that the two fluids were poured together, a solid substance was thrown down, and considerable heat evolved. Again, the lad was aware that, on mixing powdered plaster of Paris with water, there is a like increase of temperature at the moment of the composition " setting;'' or, in other words, when the water with which the plaster has been mixed passes into the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236976479
  • 9781236976475