Women in Industry; Decision of the United States Supreme Court in Curt Muller vs. State of Oregon Upholding the Constitutionality of the Oregon Ten Hour Law for Women and Brief for the State of Oregon

Women in Industry; Decision of the United States Supreme Court in Curt Muller vs. State of Oregon Upholding the Constitutionality of the Oregon Ten Hour Law for Women and Brief for the State of Oregon

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...for more than a generation; and the regeneration of the working class in that country, from the degradation in which it was sunk in 1844, is attributed to the Factory Acts, and especially to this essential feature of them. (PageS.) French Review of Hygiene and Sanitary Police. Vol. XVIII. 1896. All the world knows well that there is much to do, and that, if our legislation has already bettered conditions, new ameliorations are desirable, but they will come, I think, only through the pressure of public opinion, ... which will become exacting... when doctors have made clear the utility of a protection which regards not only the woman, but, secondarily, the child to be born by her; when it knows better that to protect the mother is an absolute necessity for the future of the race. (Page 193.) Report of the New York Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900. But the good accomplished by each successive factory law was so clearly apparent, that even capitalistic Parliament could not refuse to continue the policy of labor protection. The evidence that this policy wrought a revolutionary change in the amount of crime, pauperism, and misery is superabundant; but it is too familiar to warrant repetition now. (Page 49). The best evidence of the overwhelming success of the short-hour law from all points of view is afforded by the complete conversion of its opponents. Thus it came to pass that in 1860, when a bill was introduced to extend the ten-hour law to other branches of the textile industry, J. A. Roebuck, who had originally opposed with bitterness this kind of legislation, made the following recantation: " I am about to speak on this question under somewhat peculiar circumstances. Very early in my parliamentary career Lord Ashley, now the Earl of Shaftesbury, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236667298
  • 9781236667298