The Woman Who Battled for the Boys in Blue. Mother Bickerdyke; Her Life and Labors for the Relief of Our Soldiers. Sketches of Battles Scenes and Incidents of the Sanitary Service. Pub. for the Benefit of M.A. Bickerdyke

The Woman Who Battled for the Boys in Blue. Mother Bickerdyke; Her Life and Labors for the Relief of Our Soldiers. Sketches of Battles Scenes and Incidents of the Sanitary Service. Pub. for the Benefit of M.A. Bickerdyke

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ... great latitude in the pursuit of her labors for the soldiers. While the military movements in the vicinity of Vicksburg were taking place, men arrived constantly at Memphis from those scenes, disabled from exposure and hardships, or from wounds received in the various engagements with the Confederates. The rivers and bayous were swollen so much that the swamp lands, through which the soldiers marched, were often submerged to a depth of several feet. The Federals suffered many hardships in their attempts to reach a point from which Vicksburg could be attacked advantageously. Even General Sherman The Cow And Hen Mission. 89 led his men on foot through dense cane brakes in the darkness of night, with only the flickering rays of candles to guide them. The commodious hospitals in Memphis had not been prepared in vain, for about eleven thousand soldiers were provided for within them. Mrs. Bicker-dyke visited the different institutions frequently, besides performing her duties as matron of the Gayoso Hospital. Her experience as a housewife had made her familiar with the principles of economy, and here she was always planning to give the patients more and better food and care with the means at hand, than were already provided. Fresh milk and eggs were supplied in scant quantities, and were poor in quality. Besides, the prices were extremely high. She declared that it was perfect nonsense to give forty cents a quart for milk that resembled chalk and water. This was a source of annoyance common to all, and she determined to find a remedy for the evil, as such food was very important in the diet of the sick. The project formed in her active mind was considered impracticable--even visionary at first; but her judgment was not at fault, and her forcible...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236666062
  • 9781236666062