With the World's People; An Account of the Ethnic Origin, Primitive Estate, Early Migrations, Social Evolution, and Present Conditions and Promise of the Principal Families of Men Together with a Preliminary Inquiry on the Time, Volume 5

With the World's People; An Account of the Ethnic Origin, Primitive Estate, Early Migrations, Social Evolution, and Present Conditions and Promise of the Principal Families of Men Together with a Preliminary Inquiry on the Time, Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...said to have been established. It was on the 15 th of February that the annual ceremony was presented. The animals sacrificed were in what manner goats and dogs. When TM TMtTMre o mony was pre these had been slain at sented. the altar, two Roman youths rushed forward, and the officiating priest, dipping the point of a sword into the blood of the victims, touched it upon the young men's foreheads. But the blood stains Were immediately washed away by another priest, who used for that purpose a white wool sponge dipped in milk. Then the priests drank largely of wine to stimulate themselves for the street scene. They also ate of the goat's flesh. More particularly, they tore up the skins of the goats, fastening scraps of the same to their persons in imitation of the garb of Lupercus. They then took in their hands strips of the goatskins and ran into the streets, followed by the procession and the crowds. As they ran about they struck every one whom they could approach--especially the women--with the goathide whips. The stroke thus administered had the power to purify, and more particularly to ward off sterility from the fortunate ones who received the blow. Had the traveler taken his station on the Via Portuensis, beyond the fifth milestone from Rome, he i, uous Dese Dias might have seen a grove YlTMxt?Lcalled the Lucus Dea Dice, ersor the Grove of Dea Dia. And if his visit to this locality had been between the middle and the end of May, he should have witnessed a festival there which was as significant and poetical as anything of which the Roman race was capable. Like the other feasts, it was as old as the traditional age of Rome. The foster-mother of Romulus was said to have borne the name of Acca Laurentia. To her tradition...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236527747
  • 9781236527745