With the World's People; An Account of the Ethnic Origin, Primitive Estate, Early Migrations, Social Evolution, and Present Conditions and Promise of

With the World's People; An Account of the Ethnic Origin, Primitive Estate, Early Migrations, Social Evolution, and Present Conditions and Promise of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ... principle with these peoples to extend to every comer the courtesy and protection of the home. True it is that there was not much to offer to the wayfarer, to the stranger, in the northern woods; but whoever he was and withersoever he went, he was in with his life. The latter in turn was bound to certain principles of action. He must do no wrong while under the roof of his host. The only bar to his remaining as the guest of the household was its poverty. If the family store was so low as not to permit the further entertainment of the stranger, he was conducted by the houseman to some other dwelling where he might remain as a guest. He took with him also a parting gift, and if he had aught to bestow, gave something in turn to the master of the house. Even in later times, when the German communities emerged from the tribal state and became national, the old rights of hospitality were still held valid, and for three days at least any stranger might find refuge in a German hut. The same VII.LACK FEAST OF THE OLD GERMANS. From a copper plate by Hopper, about 1500. right of protection and safeguard were extended to all classes.. Sometimes the princes of the tribe and the princesses fled for refuge to the hospitality of their subjects, and the state might not pursue or reclaim them against the immemorial usages of the race. The Germans were excessive in both action and inaction. When they were aroused from a certain lethargy which seems to have been the home mood of the people, they rushed forth and exhibited the most vehement activity. So large and Vital Alternate leth a nature must display a ffX/oftnt most unparalleled vigor Germans, of action when once it is stirred profoundly. In war the German soldiers rushed with ferocity upon the enemy, striking...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236501314
  • 9781236501318