With Justice for All

With Justice for All : Minorities and Women in Criminal Justice

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Description

Women, and especially minorities, have long been neglected in the study of criminal justice. The government has treated disparate groups differently for too many years. Women and minorities are such a group. Is there equality among the races and gender? What does it mean to have justice for all? There is no automatic way to allow both sexes to enjoy protection unless we see a commitment to eliminate all discrimination. Gender has never been classified as a suspect classification and both women and minorities continue to suffer from laws established by the majority. This edition of the Women in Criminal Justice series demonstrates that women and minorities both deserve their dignity and the right to be treated as anyone else, and by any aspect of government, including that of the criminal justice system. Traditional literature ignores the plight of women and minorities. This publication demonstrates that everyone is entitled to the same consideration as everyone else. The terms, "minorities and women," should be set aside. We should have a world where all people are considered the equal of everyone else, with all persons being endowed with the same rights and considerations. This textbook, as developed by Janice Joseph and Dorothy Taylor, examines all the issues that impact women and minorities. By studying the issues, we hope to provide a solid basis from which to explore ourselves and the society in which we live.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 178.3 x 236.2 x 10.9mm | 335.66g
  • Pearson Education (US)
  • Prentice Hall
  • Upper Saddle River, United States
  • English
  • 0130334634
  • 9780130334633

About Janice Joseph

"Janice Joseph, Ph.D., " is a professor in the Criminal Justice Program at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. She received her Ph.D. degree from York University in Toronto, Canada. She is editor of "Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice." Her broad research interests include violence against women, women and criminal justice, youth violence, juvenile delinquency, gangs, and minorities and criminal justice. She is the author of the book "Black Youths, Delinquency and Criminal Justice" and has published numerous articles on delinquency, gangs, domestic violence, stalking, sexual harassment, and minorities and grime. "Dorothy Taylor, Ph.D., " received her Ph.D. at Florida State University. She is associate professor of criminology in the Sociology Department at the University of Miami; coordinator of the Criminology Internship Program; and program faculty member in Caribbean, African, and African-American Studies. Dr. Taylor has held the offices of trustee-at-large and secretary for the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. Her interests are in criminology, delinquency theories, minorities and criminality, and internships. Her current publications include "The Positive Influence of Bonding in Female-Headed African American Families, " and "Jumpstarting Your Career: An Internship Guide for Criminal Justice, " and her numerous articles have appeared in journals such as "The Journal of Black Psychology Law and Human Behavior, Juvenile and Family Court Journal, " and the "Journal of Applied Social Psychology."show more

Back cover copy

Women, and especially minorities, have long been neglected in the study of criminal justice. The government has treated disparate groups differently for too many years. Women and minorities are such a group. Is there equality among the races and gender? What does it mean to have justice for all? There is no automatic way to allow both sexes to enjoy protection unless we see a commitment to eliminate all discrimination. Gender has never been classified as a "suspect classification" and both women and minorities continue to suffer from laws established by the majority. This edition of the "Women in Criminal Justice" series demonstrates that women and minorities both deserve their dignity and the right to be treated as anyone else, and by any aspect of government, including that of the criminal justice system. Traditional literature ignores the plight of women and minorities. This publication demonstrates that everyone is entitled to the same consideration as everyone else. The terms, "minorities and women," should be set aside. We should have a world where all people are considered the equal of everyone else, with all persons being endowed with the same rights and considerations. This textbook, as developed by Janice Joseph and Dorothy Taylor, examines all the issues that impact women and minorities. By studying the issues, we hope to provide a solid basis from which to explore ourselves and the society in which we live.show more

Table of contents

Overview. I. VICTIMIZATION. 1. Domestic Violence and Asian Americans, Janice Joseph & Dorothy Taylor. 2. Sexual Aggression against Female College Students, Janice Joseph. 3. The Response of the United States Supreme Court to Sexual Harassment, Martin L. O'Connor. II. POLICE. 4. Police Arrest Decisions: Preliminary Results from Kentucky's MultiAgency Approach, Elizabeth L. Grossi. 5. Where is Mayberry? Community-Oriented Policing and Officers of Color, Wilson R. Palacios. 6. Women in Policing, Helen Taylor Greene. 7. U.S. Policing in Black and White: A Cross Racial Comparison of How Black and White Youth Experience Policing, Delores Jones Brown. III. CORRECTIONS. 8. Get Tough Policies and the Incarceration of African Americans, Janice Joseph, Zelma Weston Henriques & Kaylene Richards Ekeh. 9. Children of Imprisoned Mothers: What Does the Future Hold? Lanette P. Dalley. 10. Disparate Treatment in Correctional Facilities: Looking Back, Roslyn Muraskin. 11. Native Americans and the Criminal Justice System, David Lester. IV. JUVENILE JUSTICE. 12. Violent Offenses by Adolescent Girls on the Rise: Myth or Reality?, Dorothy Taylor & Luigi Esposito. 13. The Impact of Gender on Juvenile Court Decisions: A Qualitative Insight, Charles J. Corley, Timothy S. Bynum, Angel Prewitt, Pamela Schram, John Burrows. 14. Weapons, Violence, and Youth: A Study of Weapon-Related Victimization Among Urban High School Students, Zina T. McGee. Bibliographies.show more