With Her in Ourland

With Her in Ourland : Sequel to Herland

3.36 (190 ratings by Goodreads)
By (author)  , By (author)  , By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

Two works in one, this volume contains the full text of With Her in Ourland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, as well as an illuminating sociological analysis by Mary Jo Deegan with the assistance of Michael R. Hill. Ourland is the sequel to Gilman's acclaimed feminist utopian novel Herland; both were published in her journal, The Forerunner, in 1915 and 1916. Ourland resumes the adventures of ^IHerland^R's protagonists, Ellador and Van, but turns from utopian fantasy to a challenging analysis of contemporary social fissures in his land, or the real world. The republication of Herland as a separate novel in 1979 revived critical interest in Gilman's work but truncated the larger aims implicit in the ^IHerland/Ourland^R saga, leaving an erroneous understanding of Gilman's other/better half of the story, in which it is suggested that strong women can resocialize men to be nurturant and cooperative. Gilman's choice of a sexually integrated society in With Her in Ourland provides us with her answer to her ideal society, but her foray into a woman-only society as a corrective to a male dominated one is a controversial option. The challenging message of Ourland, however, does not impede the pleasure of reading it as a novel.



Though known more for her fiction today, Gilman in her time was a recognized and accomplished sociologist who admired Lester F. Ward and frequently visited Jane Addams of Chicago's Hull-House. The male protagonist in Herland/Ourland, Van, is a sociologist, used by Gilman as a foil on which to skewer the assumptions and practices of patriarchal sociology. The interpretation presented here, which adopts a sociological viewpoint, is invaluable reading for scholars and students of sociology, American women's studies, and utopian literature.
show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 152.91 x 233.93 x 16mm | 331.12g
  • Praeger Publishers Inc
  • Westport, United States
  • English
  • 0275960773
  • 9780275960773
  • 1,928,947

Table of contents

Introduction: Gilman's Sociological Journey from Herland to Ourland With Her in Ourland: Sequel to Herland The Return War A Journey of Inspection Nearing Home My Country The Diagnosis In Our Homes More Diagnosis [Democracy and Economics] [Race and Religion] [Feminism and the Woman's Movement] [Conclusion]
show more

Review quote

"Gilman's sequel to Herland continues to advance her social theories. However, With Her in Ourland (first published in 1916) is a dystopian work; it chronicles the experiences of characters Van and Ellador, following their departure from Herland as they travel the world during the Great War. As she does in much of her fiction, Gilman urges radical social reform as a way to save the world from chaos and destruction.... Deegan provides a cogent argument for reading Herland and With Her in Ourland as two halves of a greater whole.... Reommended for all public and academic collections."-Choice ..."a splendid book, a delight to have now available. Mary Jo Deegan's introduction is filled with useful insights and information....Deegan's angle of vision is sociological, and that makes her reading of this story different from most Gilman scholarship."-Theories and Epistemology "He's a brash American adventurer; she's an independent, albeit sheltered, sociologist from Herland, a 2000-year-old, all-female society. Not surprisingly, when Vandyck (Van) and Ellador marry, most everything becomes a point of negotiation, if not contention: sexual relations, family obligations and attitudes about race, class, and the welfare state....the book is a window into the second decade of the 20th century...many of Gilman's observations are prescient and astute."-Publishers Weekly ""[T]his is a significant book. A sequel to Gilman's feminist classic, Herland (1916), this continues yet radically changes that book's utopian vision....More sociological tract than novel, the book analyzes social, economic, and political problems, discussing overpopulation, gender roles, environmentalism, the care of children, and racism--issues that are surprisingly relevant today. The final pages of the book provide an unexpected twist that completes the reader's understanding of Gilman's overall purpose. Recommended for academic libraries.""-Library Journal ""YThis is a significant book. A sequel to Gilman's feminist classic, Herland (1916), this continues yet radically changes that book's utopian vision....More sociological tract than novel, the book analyzes social, economic, and political problems, discussing overpopulation, gender roles, environmentalism, the care of children, and racism--issues that are surprisingly relevant today. The final pages of the book provide an unexpected twist that completes the reader's understanding of Gilman's overall purpose. Recommended for academic libraries.""-Library Journal ?...a splendid book, a delight to have now available. Mary Jo Deegan's introduction is filled with useful insights and information....Deegan's angle of vision is sociological, and that makes her reading of this story different from most Gilman scholarship.?-Theories and Epistemology ?He's a brash American adventurer; she's an independent, albeit sheltered, sociologist from Herland, a 2000-year-old, all-female society. Not surprisingly, when Vandyck (Van) and Ellador marry, most everything becomes a point of negotiation, if not contention: sexual relations, family obligations and attitudes about race, class, and the welfare state....the book is a window into the second decade of the 20th century...many of Gilman's observations are prescient and astute.?-Publishers Weekly ?"[T]his is a significant book. A sequel to Gilman's feminist classic, Herland (1916), this continues yet radically changes that book's utopian vision....More sociological tract than novel, the book analyzes social, economic, and political problems, discussing overpopulation, gender roles, environmentalism, the care of children, and racism--issues that are surprisingly relevant today. The final pages of the book provide an unexpected twist that completes the reader's understanding of Gilman's overall purpose. Recommended for academic libraries."?-Library Journal ?Gilman's sequel to Herland continues to advance her social theories. However, With Her in Ourland (first published in 1916) is a dystopian work; it chronicles the experiences of characters Van and Ellador, following their departure from Herland as they travel the world during the Great War. As she does in much of her fiction, Gilman urges radical social reform as a way to save the world from chaos and destruction.... Deegan provides a cogent argument for reading Herland and With Her in Ourland as two halves of a greater whole.... Reommended for all public and academic collections.?-Choice .,."a splendid book, a delight to have now available. Mary Jo Deegan's introduction is filled with useful insights and information....Deegan's angle of vision is sociological, and that makes her reading of this story different from most Gilman scholarship."-Theories and Epistemology
show more

About Charlotte Perkins Gilman

CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN (1860-1935) was an eminent feminist sociologist and novelist, perhaps best known professionally for Women in Economics (1898, repr. 1966) and, as a fiction writer, for her semiautobiographical novella, The Yellow Wallpaper (1892, repr. 1973).



MARY JO DEEGAN is Professor of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Among her earlier publications are Jane Addams and the Men of the Chicago School, 1892-1918, Women in Sociology: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook (Greenwood, 1991) and American Ritual Drama (Greenwood, 1989).



MICHAEL R. HILL is an interdisciplinary social scientist from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Iowa Western Community College. He is author of Archival Strategies and Techniques (1993), editor of Harnet Martineau's How to Observe Morals and Manners (1989), and coeditor, with Mary Jo Deegan, of Women and Symbolic Interaction (1987).
show more

Rating details

190 ratings
3.36 out of 5 stars
5 14% (27)
4 32% (61)
3 31% (59)
2 21% (40)
1 2% (3)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X