Wire Rope Transportation in All Its Branches; Wire Rope Tramways with Special Reference to the Bleichert and Acme Patent Systems [...]

Wire Rope Transportation in All Its Branches; Wire Rope Tramways with Special Reference to the Bleichert and Acme Patent Systems [...]

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...rapid wear of the track rollers is a source of constant expense in the operation of any plane. If they are not kept in good repair, the rope soon begins to suffer. The irregularities of the surface of the ordinary kinds of rope is the chief cause of this rapid wear, which is always greatest when the rope is new; as the interstices between the rope strands become filled up and the outer wires worn down, the wear becomes less. The use of the patent "locked wire rope," which is perfectly smooth from the beginning, does away with all of this wear, and wherever it is used the life of the track rollers is extended almost indefinitely. Fig. 11 represents a very good type of track roller. A wooden cylinder fits into iron rings at each end. The axle consists of a bolt with a collar at one end and a nut at the other, the ends being turned down. The hole in the wooden cylinder is large enough to allow the axle to pass through easily, but fits tightly in the iron rings at each end. On the inside of the end rings are ribs which imbed themselves in the wood when the nut is screwed up. These rollers not only give better service than the ordinary wooden roller, but as the cylinders wear out they can be quickly replaced by new ones. Although wooden rollers appear to meet with most favor, iron ones are preferred in many mines. Common forms of these are illustrated in Figs. 12, 13 and 14. Fig. 13 represents a self-lubricating track roller which we have lately introduced. This roller revolves on a fixed axle, consisting of a short piece of extraheavy pipe, pierced at the center with holes. The ends are plugged up, and oil is poured in a small pipe projecting upwards at one end, and runs through the holes at the center into the cavity of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123692505X
  • 9781236925053