William the Silent; Prince of Orange, the Moderate Man of the Sixteenth Century the Story of His Life as Told from His Own Letters, from Those of His Friends and Enemies and from Official Documents

William the Silent; Prince of Orange, the Moderate Man of the Sixteenth Century the Story of His Life as Told from His Own Letters, from Those of His Friends and Enemies and from Official Documents

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...and cauteries. "The states-general possess plenary power. In them lies the sole remedy for our ills. We undoubtedly have the means to convene them, but we do not seem to wish to be cured.... Our small pox is corruption of faith, of justice, of finance; huge debts and humiliation oppress us. The nobles seem almost annihilated, offices and benefices are in the hands of unworthy incumbents. To cure all this by words, forsooth! "The inquisition is published in Hainault, Flanders, Artois, Lisle, Douay, Orchies. It is intended that it shall be naturalised everywhere, and this will be accomplished if words be the only force opposed to these measures. "I beg and implore you hasten to come to help us with your advice. I hope you will bring a certain treatise you promised me, on when it is lawful for the inferior magistrate to take arms against the tyranny of his superiors." It is easy to picture the impatience of such people as the writer of this letter, towards the prince's extreme moderation. The hesitation and deliberation with which he took each step, applying the brake at every revolution of the wheel, were exasperating to the men of one idea. The party at Breda grew larger, and the discussions grew hotter, but Orange remained calm. Egmont, meanwhile, grew more and more restless and uneasy, afraid to go forward, and yet too sympathetic with his fellow-countrymen to be able to approve the action of the court, as did royalists like Aerschot and Berlaymont. In the Apology, Orange, speaking rather from the The situation was somewhat like that at the beginning of our civil war, when Lincoln would not march abreast with the desires of the abolitionists. Still Groen's statement (ii., 15) that the confederation was formed without the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236517377
  • 9781236517371