The Wilderness and Its Tenants; A Series of Geographical and Other Essays Illustrative of Life in a Wild Country, Together with Experiences and Observations Culled from the Great Book of Nature in Many Lands Volume 1

The Wilderness and Its Tenants; A Series of Geographical and Other Essays Illustrative of Life in a Wild Country, Together with Experiences and Observations Culled from the Great Book of Nature in Many Lands Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...article of food with vast numbers of natives inhabiting tropical countries--and it is possible to live upon it exclusively, for long periods of time, without experiencing any evil effects. What would have become of Mr. Stanley's expedition, for instance, without the banana? Really good bananas, in first-rate condition, are, we venture to think, as delicious and harmless a fruit as it is possible to find; which can be partaken of as largely, and eaten as frequently, as almost any fruit we could name, subject to the conditions indicated THE BANANA. 229 above. First-rate bananas, however, are strictly a production of the torrid zones; and if grown in semi-tropical countries, and cut in an unripe green state (for carriage to the London market for instance), cannot be expected to prove t'air examples of the banana such as are grown tc perfection at places like Colombo, Batavia, Madras, or other warm and equable tropical stations. At Bombay a large variety of the banana, with a deep-red rind, is to be met with, worth taking note of as a special variety of this fruit; but it cannot, we think, bear comparison as to excellence with the smaller, yellow varieties, grown within the equatorial zone: the smaller fruits (short and thick in shape) being, as far as our experience goes, in general superior to those of a larger, and usually coarser, growth. At the same time, long continued efforts at acclimatization have been so far successful, that the banana has been transplanted from its natural habitat, the equatorial zone, to colder regions, far beyond even the limits of the tropics. Bananas, for instance, are found growing all over the North Western provinces in India; and we have even seen them growing in cold elevated stations like Darjeeling, in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236670701
  • 9781236670700