Why It's Hard to be Good

Why It's Hard to be Good : An Introduction to Ethical Theory

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Description

"Why It's Hard to Be Good" by Donald Palmer is a text for Ethical Theory and Ethical Problems courses, and is ideal for instructors using primary source readings. Through the use of cartoons and humor Palmer makes the study of ethics easier!
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Product details

  • Paperback | 432 pages
  • 160 x 231.1 x 17.8mm | 544.32g
  • Mayfield Publishing Co ,U.S.
  • United States
  • English
  • 0767424093
  • 9780767424097
  • 1,895,203

Table of contents

PROLOGUE CHAPTER ONE: MORAL PHILOSOPHY AND ITS DISCONTENTS What Philosophy Is What Moral Philosophy Is Stumbling Blocks The Relation between Fact and Value The Is/Ought Problem The Naturalistic Fallacy The Problem of Determinism Determinism Compatibilism Libertarianism The Problem of Cultural Relativism No Universally Held Moral Values No Value or Set of Values Recommendable for All People The Challenge of Logical Positivism The Challenge of Existentialism The Challenge of Feminism A Quick Recap Foundationalism Religious Ethics The Game Plan Addendum: Moral Claims, Truth and Falsity Questions for Consideration Questions for the Addendum Study Guide: Outline of Chapter One Outline of the Addendum For Further Reading Addendum: For Further Reading Notes CHAPTER TWO: EGOISM AND HEDONISM Epicurus Hellenic Vigor and Hellenistic Malaise Atoms The Soul, Gods, and the Afterlife Freedom Pleasure as the Motive and Goal of Life Desire The Virtues Friendship Thomas Hobbes Hobbes's Life Hobbes's Egoism Criticism of Psychological Egoism Hobbes's Dilemma: How Is a Society of Egoists Possible? Ayn Rand Rand's Life Egoism and Reason Egoism and Value Egoism and Hedonism Egoism and Individual Rights Egoism and Capitalism Egoism and Minimalist Government Egoism and Taxation No Real Conflicts of Interest The Is/Ought Problem Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses Questions for Consideration Study Guide: Outline of Chapter Two For Further Reading Notes CHAPTER THREE: KANTIAN ETHICS Kant and Hume: What Can We Know? Kant's Ethics A Good Will Duty Rational Nature How Duty Commands and Motivates Us The Is/Ought Problem Perfect and Imperfect Duties Moral Law: The Categorical Imperative Number 1: The Formula of Universal Law (FUL) Number 2: The Formula of the Law of Nature (FLN) Number 3: The Formula of Humanity as an End in Itself (FH) Number 4: The Formula of Autonomy (FA) Number 5: The Formula of the Realm of Ends (FRE) Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses Questions for Consideration Study Guide: Outline of Chapter Three For Further Reading Notes CHAPTER FOUR: UTILITARIAN ETHICS Background of Utilitarianism Jeremy Bentham Bentham's Hedonism The Calculus of Felicity One Person, One Vote Facts and Values John Stuart Mill Mill's Rejection of the Calculus One Person, One Vote? Why Should We Do It? Utilitarianism: A More Precise Characterization Welfarist Consequentialist Aggregative Universalist Attacks on Utilitarianism and Utilitarian Defenses The Problem of Meritoriousness and Fairness Act Utilitarianism and Rule Utilitarianism The Consequentialist Problem The Problem of Utilitarian Sainthood The Problem of Consistency The Is/Ought Problem Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses Questions for Consideration Study Guide: Outline of Chapter Four For Further Reading Notes CHAPTER FIVE: EVOLUTIONARY ETHICS Charles Darwin Theory of Evolution "Natural Selection": Continuity and Variation Religious Objections "Darwin's Dangerous Idea" Darwinism and the Human Being Darwinism and Morality How Darwin Undermines Traditional Ethical Theories, Despite Himself James Rachels's Moral Individualism Implications of Moral Individualism for Our Attitudes toward Humans Rachels and Darwin The Is/Ought Problem The Evolution of Altruism: Sober and Wilson's Unto Others Group Selection Cultural Norms Psychological Altruism and Evolution Good News and Bad News Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses Questions for Consideration Study Guide: Outline of Chapter Five For Further Reading Notes CHAPTER SIX: VIRTUE ETHICS Virtue Ethics in the Classical World Plato Aristotle Virtue Ethics in Our World Contemporary Virtue Ethics Aristotle Today The Nature of Virtue Alasdair MacIntyre and the Historicity of Virtue The Unity of Virtue Thesis Whom Do the Virtues Benefit? Criticism of Virtue Ethics The Charge of Circularity Can Virtue Ethics Give Moral Advice? The Is/Ought Problem Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses Questions for Consideration Study Guide: Outline of Chapter Six For Further Reading Notes CHAPTER SEVEN: CONTRACTUALISM Thomas Hobbes Hobbes and the Crocodiles Hobbes, the Optimist? Hobbes and Equality The State of Nature Hobbes's Contractarianism Hobbes's Defenders John Rawls Justice as Fairness The Veil of Ignorance Rawls's Critics T.M. Scanlon Rawls and Scanlon The Contractual Formula What Do We Owe to Each Other? Reasons vs. Desires Reasons Only Part of Morality Contractualism and Kant Contractualism and Utilitarianism Relativism The Is/Ought Problem and the Naturalistic Fallacy Scanlon's Critics Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses Questions for Consideration Study Guide: Outline of Chapter Seven For Further Reading Notes GLOSSARY INDEX
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Rating details

13 ratings
3.92 out of 5 stars
5 46% (6)
4 15% (2)
3 31% (4)
2 0% (0)
1 8% (1)
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