The Whole Proceedings of the Court of Enquiry Upon the Conduct of Sir Hew Dalrymple; Late Commander-In-Chief of His Majesty's Forces in Portugal, Relative to the Convention of Cintra. Held in the Great Hall, Chelsea College, from Monday,

The Whole Proceedings of the Court of Enquiry Upon the Conduct of Sir Hew Dalrymple; Late Commander-In-Chief of His Majesty's Forces in Portugal, Relative to the Convention of Cintra. Held in the Great Hall, Chelsea College, from Monday,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1808 edition. Excerpt: ...always re gret. 'Sir A._ Wellesley marked down the ohjections, 'which were sent to'Lieutenant Colonel Murray.--Oii the 80th, he returned with the Definitive Treaty, some parts of whichhe could not say had his entire approbation, but they were of minor importance. On Wednesdziy, the 24th of August, he received an account of the arrival of Sir J-. Moore and General Hope at Mondego bay; and' that they had arrived on'the Monday preceding, and were not able to debark. He sent, for answer, _they were to land as soon as possible. On the 25th, Captain Malcolm arrived with word, that they could not debark on account of the surf.--Next day Sir J. Moore and General Hope arrived, when it wassettled that the troops should land, whenever they could do so with-safety. He then convened the Lieutenant Generals, and declared that Sir A. Wellesley should not be put in a subordinate situation, for that his valour, and the victory which he had-gained, entitled him to a superior command, and proposed that he should command the left wing ofthe army. He would do the Generals justice in saying, that they all cheerfully acquiesced, although some of them were of higher standing in the army. He wished to observe, that although he had employed Lieutenant Colonel Murray to write a letter to Junot, and also Sir A. VVellesley, from their having a more perfect local knowledge of the situations of the armies, that he meant not to makethem responsible; for it never was his wish to charge acts that were his own upon any other person. YVhen the Convention was brought to be ratified, although he acted with themost decided approbation of all the _General Officers, yet he conceived himself only personally answerable for its.consequences.--Sir A. Wellesley''s letter to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236891244
  • 9781236891242