What the Pennsylvania Railroad Has Done and Hopes to Do for Baltimore

What the Pennsylvania Railroad Has Done and Hopes to Do for Baltimore : Being an Address by Mr. George R. Sinnickson, Superintendent Pennsylvania Lines, Before the City Club of Baltimore, February 24th, 1917 (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from What the Pennsylvania Railroad Has Done and Hopes to Do for Baltimore: Being an Address by Mr. George R. Sinnickson, Superintendent Pennsylvania Lines, Before the City Club of Baltimore, February 24th, 1917 There are only three large seaports touched by the Pennsylvania Railroad 3 namely, New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore. The first of these, being nearest the manufacturing district of New England, had the most rapid growth; while the last named - Baltimore - being nearest the Pittsburgh iron district and the bituminous coal fields, which products are now exported in large quantities, is having the most rapid growth. Another factor which has brought Baltimore into prominence is the transportation through the Panama Canal, which will develop after the war. It developed at the time the Suez Canal was opened, that certain seaports along the Mediterranean which were previously little known suddenly received a tremendous impetus, and a large portion of the world's shipping. During the construction of the Panama Canal many people conjectured what would be the seaport on the Atlantic Coast to benefit to such a large extent by the new trade routes resulting from its construction. We believe that the Chesapeake Bay is the logical part of the coast to receive this increased business, for the reason that the ports of Baltimore and Norfolk, are fed by six large railroads leading from the bituminous coal fields and the steel plants of Pennsylvania and the West; namely, the Baltimore and Ohio, the Pennsylvania, the Western Maryland, the Chesapeake and Ohio, the Norfolk and Western and the Virginian; and for this reason more vessels will put into this bay for coal and other supplies than at any other point along the Atlantic seaboard. We further believe that the major portion of these other suppiles and a very large portion of the coal will be furnished at Baltimore. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 22 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 1mm | 45g
  • Forgotten Books
  • United States
  • English
  • , black & white illustrations
  • 0243281943
  • 9780243281947