Western Electrician Volume 10-11

Western Electrician Volume 10-11

By (author) 

List price: US$32.96

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...riu'.rr surimiiuiw. BOAT. pearing at the surface. In the prosecution of his studies a number of interesting experiments were tried. To satisfy himself exactly as to how the buoyancy of a vessel in water was changed by slight additions to its weight, or load, a bottle was weighted down with fine bird shot until the top of its neck was just flush with the surface of the water. A cork with a funnel-shaped hole through it had been placed in the botte's month, by this arrangement it was a comparatively easy matter to drop the shot into the bottle even after the cork had gone under the surface. With this apparatus Mr. Baker satisfied himself that through slight variations in its weight or its load, a vessel could be sunk to, and kept at, almost any desired depth. At the inception of his ideas of a submarine boat, to make a practical test he first constructed a model about sixteen inches long. This little craft was built of sheet copper on lines that might be described as flat cigarshaped, and it was driven by clock works. The boat was pointed at both ends, but its depth from keel to top was very much greater than its width; it was almost flat--in fact, when in the water the little craft was in arpearance, and. not unlike the sunfish with which every small boy is familiar. This model was provided with two r31-inch screws, one on each side of the vessel's center; that is, the screw shaft passed through the boat's center, midway between the pointed stern and pointed bow, and midway between the keel and top. The screws were swung to their horizontal shaft by a sleeve, and were driven by bevel gearing. By this arrangement both propellers could be turned on the shaft, set to revolving at any angle, and thus made to force the boat ahead, back, up or...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 1162 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 58mm | 2,023g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236974352
  • 9781236974358