We have a strong city

We have a strong city : Vocal score

  • Sheet music
By (composer) 

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Description

for SATB, trumpet in C, and organ This substantial anthem was composed in 2015 to celebrate the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta and to mark Salisbury Cathedral's stewardship of the charter since 1215. Rutter succeeds in weaving together passages from the books of Isaiah, Zechariah, and Amos with music that is both ceremonial and mysteriously intense to create a dignified and powerful work.show more

Product details

  • Sheet music | 20 pages
  • 190 x 269 x 2mm | 52g
  • Oxford University Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • 0193511622
  • 9780193511620

About John Rutter

John Rutter was born in London in 1945 and studied music at Clare College, Cambridge. His compositions embrace choral, orchestral, and instrumental music, and he has edited or co-edited various choral anthologies, including four Carols for Choirs volumes with Sir David Willcocks and the Oxford Choral Classics series. From 1975 to 1979 he was Director of Music at Clare College, and in 1981 he formed his own choir, the Cambridge Singers. He now divides his time between composition and conducting and is sought after as a guest conductor for the world's leading choirs and orchestras.show more

Review quote

We have a strong city, with words from Isaiah, Zechariah and Amos, was written for Salisbury Cathedral to mark its stewardship of Magna Carta, and is a 7 and a half minute reflection on what God expects of his people and his reward for them. The music is derived from a little (ideally distant) trumpet motif heard at the start. Rutter's writing for choir and organ is surefooted and he is always sensitive to words; this is an anthem of noble intensity. Particularly magical is the way he treats 'and the hills shall break forth before you into singing' where the word 'singing' is repeated eight times, firstly in a rising sequence, then falling away on a descending A to D, an inversion of the trumpet's opening D-A motif. * James L. Montgomery, Sunday by Sunday (CMQ), March 2017 *show more