Waterloo Letters; A Selection from Original and Hitherto Unpublished Letters Bearing on the Operations of the 16th, 17th, and 18th June, 1815, by Officers Who Served in the Campaign

Waterloo Letters; A Selection from Original and Hitherto Unpublished Letters Bearing on the Operations of the 16th, 17th, and 18th June, 1815, by Officers Who Served in the Campaign

By (author) 

List price: US$20.76

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...period the only individuals we saw were the Duke of Richmond and his sons, who, arriving from Brussels, crossed our front, and galloped away towards the Right. I think it' must have been past noon when the Adjutant of "the Horse Artillery came to conduct us to the Position B, on the extreme right of the 2nd Line, or what I then considered as such. Here we formed up facing towards Nivelles, en potence as it were to the 1st Line, having a Ravine (if I may so call it) in our front, running from Troop moved to the right. Formed up in front of Merbe Braine, and facing the Cavalry on the extreme French left. Sir A. Dickson was detached from the Troop, and in command of the Battering Train.--En. Hougoumont in the direction of Merbe Braine, in which, as well as I can remember, were Riflemen or Light Infantry and some Cavalry of the German Legion. On our left, extending towards the Nivelles road, and somewhat in advance, was a Battery of Foot Artillery, commanded by Captain Bolton, who was killed shortly after our arrival; what other troops there might have been beyond, I do not remember. There were none of any description on our right. In rear of us was the 14th Regiment of Infantry lying down in square. Beyond the Ravine the ground ascended at first rather abruptly, and then continued in a gentle slope for a considerable distance. Up this ran the great road to Nivelles, having extensive corn-fields on either side of it, interspersed (if I recollect right) with a few clumps of wood, -and, on what appeared from our position, the summit of the slope, was drawn up a large body of Cavalry, consisting principally, if not entirely of Lancers, as marked in the Plan. On their right were several Batteries of both heavy and light Guns, the latter...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 146 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 272g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236861582
  • 9781236861580