Water Terminal and Transfer Facilities; Letter from the Acting Secretary of War Transmitting, with a Letter from the Chief of Engineers, Reports on an

Water Terminal and Transfer Facilities; Letter from the Acting Secretary of War Transmitting, with a Letter from the Chief of Engineers, Reports on an

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...Channel. The data concerning water terminals, etc, given in relation to Ambrose Channel, apply to the 30-foot channel, so far as it is used at all. AMBROSE CHANNEL. This is strictly an entrance channel to the port of New York. Its nearest approach to shore is 1 mile, and consequently it has no landings along its course. Its water terminals are on the water front of the port of New York, including Brooklyn, N. Y., and Hoboken, Jersey City, and Newark, N. J. (a) The water terminals, so far as they relate to commerce through Ambrose Channel, cover about 26 miles of improved front containing 400 piers, of which probably 150 are devoted wholly or largely to ships using Ambrose Channel. In the city of New York 230 piers are owned by the city, of which 29 are used for municipal purposes. The others are open to all water carriers upon equal terms, the terms being usually long leases for exclusive use. Several of the larger privately owned piers are leased in the same way. Ships making occasional or irregular trips to New York (" tramp" ships) are, as a rule, consigned to agents who arrange for wharfage. One hundred and twenty-five piers are owned or controlled by railroads in New York and New Jersey. The rates for wharfage vary widely, from one-fourth cent to 4 cents per ton. (6) About 140 of these piers have direct physical connection with railroads by tracks running to the piers. Practically all of them have indirect railroad connection by means of car floats and lighters. (- General location and description. (61 Physical connection between water terminals and railroads. It is understood that a sort of prorating arrangement exists between the railroads of the Eastern Traffic Association for carrying foreign-bound freights to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 168 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236524985
  • 9781236524980