Water-Supply Paper Volume 235-238

Water-Supply Paper Volume 235-238

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...efflorescence of alkaline material, and it is probable that the waters here are very heavily impregnated. CHARACTER OF WATER. A single sample of water was taken from the Mohave at Victorville on March 17, 1908. At this place, at which it has been proposed to erect a dam to impound water for irrigation, the river bottom is rocky, with large stretches of shifting sand, and the current is swift. The results of the analysis are shown in the following table: Analysis of water of Mohave River at Victorville, March 17, 1908. Analyst. Walton Van Winkle. Parts per million. Turbidity 15 Silica (SiO, ) 25 Iron (Fe).20 Calcium (Ca) 15 Magnesium (Mg) 2. 9 Sodium and potassium (Na+K). 15 Parts per million. Carbonate radicle (C03) 0 Bicarbonate radicle (HC03) 83 Sulphate radicle (SOJ 7. 9 Chlorine(Cl) 6 Nitrate radicle (NO, ) 36 Total solids 117 So far as may be judged from a single analysis, the water of Mohave River at the Narrows is of excellent quality. Total solids are low, hardness is small and chiefly temporary, and serious mineral contamination is not indicated. For use in boilers no treatment of the water is necessary. Soap consumption is small, and the water is admirably adapted for general purposes. SALTON SEA. As the Colorado River drainage in California is small and unimportant a general investigation of its waters was not attempted. For special purposes, however, analyses have been made of the waters of Salton Sea, the large, shallow body of water lying in a depression at the head of Imperial Valley in what was formerly called Salton Sink. Once an inland sea formed by the waters of the Colorado, it later lost its inlet through the silting up of the channel, and finally dried up into a saline bed or sink, and small streams flowing into it.show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 318g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236921364
  • 9781236921369