Washington Reports Volume 37

Washington Reports Volume 37

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...in interest, but this does not prove that something less than a fee was conveyed by the deed of conveyance. Equity acts upon the person as well as upon things, and it would have compelled such con veyance, as being a personal obligation on the part of Lc Carter to deal equitably, not because of any interest the grantors retained in the land. This is made plain when it is remembered that equity would have acted in the same way with reference to the proceeds of a sale of the land, had McGarter sold it and retained the proceeds after his grantors had paid the debts from other sources. It would have compelled him to pay over the proceeds, not because the grantees retained any interest in the land which attached itself to the proceeds, but because of the personal obligation of McCarter to deal equitably. The trust created was a personal trust, not one that ran with the lands, and whether McCarter conveyed the land voluntar ily, or whether it was taken away from him by virtue of a superior title, all of the interest his grantors had therein would have passed, andsuch grantors could not recover it from those lawfully acquiring it through McCarter. There was in these lands, therefore, no such interest retained as would require McCarter's grantors, or the intended bene ficiaries of the conveyance, to be made parties to a foreclosure suit in order to pass the fee in the lands at the foreclosure sale. It is not a universal rule of equity pleading that all persons interested in a trust estate, and whose rights may be affected by the final decree, must be parties to the suit. It has been held in Massachusetts, that, in a suit concerning the title to assets of an insolvent estate, it was not necessary to make the assignors or creditors parties, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 258 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 467g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236846966
  • 9781236846969