Warming Buildings by Hot Water; A Practical Treatise Upon Warming Industrial and Residential Buildings, Places of Worship and Horticultural Glasshouses

Warming Buildings by Hot Water; A Practical Treatise Upon Warming Industrial and Residential Buildings, Places of Worship and Horticultural Glasshouses : Heating Drying-Rooms ... and the High-Pressure Systems

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...colours so commonly used, and which make radiators look so much like ironwork and factory goods, have retarded their use in residences and other good interiors. It matters not how beautiful the design of a radiator may be, if it is painted purple-brown it will be instantly barred from entering any good residence. Ladies cannot see how nice a radiator can be made to look, when it is so coloured. White is the writer's favourite decoration, and it suits all radiators. With some it makes them look like porcelain, while the plainest are improved. Strange as it may sound, a white radiator is by no means a conspicuous object in a room. The white should be good and not assume a cream tint in the course of a short time. Either dead white or enamel look well, or the two can be worked together. If white is objected to, then make it an object to use light tints if any way possible. They make a radiator less conspicuous than dark colours, and are pleasing to any eye that rests upon them. Reference to page 8 will show that all colours are available for this work, but a certain amount of doubt exists as to how bronze powders affect the radiating qualities of the surfaces they may be applied to. In the majority of cases bronze powder decoration does not show the best taste, and might well be left out of use entirely. On page 59 is given particulars as to how the decoration of radiators entails some extra and special work, and this must always be borne in mind when estimating the cost of erecting an apparatus. CHAPTER XII HEAT EMISSION FROM RADIATORS AND PIPES This subject has a very near relationship to that of the next Chapter, which is devoted to the amount or area of radiating surface required to afford certain temperatures in rooms of various sizes...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123697218X
  • 9781236972187