Waes Hael, the Book of Toasts; Being, for the Most Part, Bubbles Gathered from the Wine of Others' Wit, With, Here and There, an Occasional Humbler Globule Believed to Be More or Less Original

Waes Hael, the Book of Toasts; Being, for the Most Part, Bubbles Gathered from the Wine of Others' Wit, With, Here and There, an Occasional Humbler Globule Believed to Be More or Less Original

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...I drink but thee. ' Owen Meredith. Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper, Thy head, thy sovereign. Shakespeare. There's a beautiful toast To the feminine host--There's a swing to " the ladies--God bless 'em," But the women should cry With their glasses on high, A toast to the men who dress 'em! When a man hasn't anything to say That is the best time not to say it. It takes more genius to be a man than manhood to be a genius. As to the differences between men and women I believe that when their accounts have been properly balanced it will be found that it has been a case of six of one and half a dozen of the other, both in the matter of sovereignty and of mereness, and therefore without prejudice I propose that the sixes to which I belong shall rise and cordially drink to the health of the other half dozens, our kind and generous hosts of to-night. Sarah Grand. " Man was built after all other things had been made and pronounced good. If not, he would have insisted on-giving his orders as to the rest of the job." Let every man be master of his time Till seven at night. Shakespeare. He is the half part of a blessed man Left to be finished by such as she. Shakespeare. Man is certainly stark mad; he cannot make a worm, and yet he will be making gods by dozens. Montaigne. But man, proud man Drest in a. little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assured, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven As make the angels weep. Shakespeare. " Here's to man: --he is like a kerosene-lamp; he is not especially bright; he is often turned down; he generally smokes; and he frequently goes out at night." A merrier man, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236938275
  • 9781236938275