A Voyage to Hudson's-Bay by the Dobbs Galley and California, in the Years 1746 and 1747, for Discovering a North West Passage

A Voyage to Hudson's-Bay by the Dobbs Galley and California, in the Years 1746 and 1747, for Discovering a North West Passage

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1748 edition. Excerpt: ...5 nor is there any Tracks or Paths lefte to direct one; all being very M _ i speedily B u 'r these severe Colds are not felt above four or five Days in a Month, and generally about the Full and Change of the Moon, which is observed to have a mighty Influence on the Weather in these Parts. Then it is very tempestuous; the Wind at North West, one may say constantly in the Winter; and generally at those Periods in the Summer. But at other Times, tho' there is a continued hard Frost, yet it is pleasant enough; the Winds are variable and moderate; and one can very well go abroad either shooting or trapping. T H E People now began to come from their Tents, weekly, for their Provisions' out of the Ship, of which they used but little, in the Beginning of the Season, while the Rabbits were Plenty, nay, they in a good them upon small Sledges, made of about a dozen thin Staves joined together, four in Breadth, and turned up at one End, that they might the better and more easily flide over the Snow.-One Man may conveniently draw on such a Sledgc, above a Hundred Weight, fifteen or fixteen Miles in a Wintefls Day. The Dogs in this Country are of the Size of common Mastiffs, and by Nature never bark, but growl when they are provoked; and these Dogs being the only Beasts of Burthen, used there by English or Indians, will draw much more, and that to a greater Distance, if necessary. In long journies, through deep Snows, the Men generally go before them to beat a Path with their Snow Shoes; the Dogs soon grow accustomed to whatever they are taught, and being docil and tractable are very useful. They are regularly fed by the English upon the same Allowancc as the Men; but the Natives are quite remiss in this Respect, so that theirs live chiefly on what they...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236798325
  • 9781236798329