Voyage Along the Eastern Coast of Africa; To Mosambique, Johanna, and Quiloa; To St. Helena; To Rio de Janeiro, Bahia, and Pernambuco in Brazil, in the Nisus Frigate

Voyage Along the Eastern Coast of Africa; To Mosambique, Johanna, and Quiloa; To St. Helena; To Rio de Janeiro, Bahia, and Pernambuco in Brazil, in the Nisus Frigate

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1819 edition. Excerpt: ...further than the formation of trinkets for their women. Unlike most islanders, they do not seem fond of the water; they have, indeed, some large boats, but we saw only the rotten remains of two, about fifteen or twenty tons burthen each; and their canoes, though skilfully managed, seemed indifferently put together. The sultan has a guard, at all times, in his palace; but, in easons of necessity, every man becomes a soldier, and, to facilitate this purpose, arms are kept in the principal houses for immediate distribution. They chew areca and betel, like the Asiatics, and offer it to strangers as we do snuff; this custom, I believe, is not general in the other African islands, or on the continent. Diseases are confined to a slight cold of fever, for which simples are prescribed by the priests, but the medical art is at the lowest ebb; simple habits, temperance, and the climate, form the grand and surest restoratives. The measles, however, were introduced some years ago and made considerable havoc.. There are two distinct races of people, those of Moorish or Arabian descent, and another apparently mixed and somewhat darker iucolour; tothese may be added some negroes, who are slaves. The sultan and all the principal people belong to the former class; t-heir features are marked and expressive, and in many might be termed handsome; we saw none either disagreeable or deformed. It is diflicult to form an estimate ofthe population of the island, as neither the king nor any of his ministers seem acquainted with the subject. No data, as 'we, were told, are kept for this purpose, and more than one, whom I asked respecting the cause, replied, with great VonoIas and. TRAVELS, No. 4. Vol. II. I simplicity, that it was not thought necessary to count the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236990552
  • 9781236990556