Vocational Education Survey of Minneapolis, Minn., Made by the National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education. December, 1916

Vocational Education Survey of Minneapolis, Minn., Made by the National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education. December, 1916

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...stores, and office work. Laundries were added because of the large number of women employed. The difficulty always encountered in the study of women's occupations, that of getting satisfactory wage data, should be mentioned. The wages reported for the various occupations for women are approximated in this report and such factors as short days and short seasons are not taken into consideration, hence they can not be looked upon as standard rates such as are reported in the building, metal, and printing trades, in which, to a very great extent, a regular wage scale exists. The accompanying table shows practically all the employment of women in manufacturing and mechanical industries in Minneapolis as reported by the Industrial Survey of the Minneapolis Civic and Commerce Association in 1914. This table concerns only manufacturing and mechanical industries as carried on in workshops and factories, but not laundry workers, milliners, dressmakers nor departmentstore workers, who are considered in this and following chapters. Table 13 EMPLOYMENT OF WOMEN IN MINNEAPOLIS INDUSTRIES. From Minneapolis Civic and Commerce Association industrial Survey. The United States Census of Occupations in 1910 reported for Minneapolis 934 women employed as laundry operatives in laundries and 735 employed as such elsewhere, 2,999 dressmakers and seamstresses, 1,834 milliners, and 1,397 saleswomen. Accurate wage reports for women's employment can not be made without an exhaustive census of workers or a study of pay rolls. There are many reasons for this, largely characteristic of women's trades. Among these are the seasonal character of work and constant fluctuation of earnings because of interrupted work, varying amount earned by the piecework system in the factory...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 250 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 454g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236630912
  • 9781236630919