Vintage Roger
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Vintage Roger : Letters from the POW Years

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Description

'I think prison has done me very little harm and some good. I am now far better read, far less smug and conceited, far more tolerant and considerably more capable of looking after myself'

In 1930, twenty-one-year-old Roger Mortimer was commissioned into the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards and spent the next eight years stationed at Chelsea Barracks. He lived a fairly leisurely existence, with his parents' house in Cadogan Square a stone's throw away, and pleasant afternoons whiled away at the racecourse or a members' club. Admittedly things got a little tricky in Palestine in 1938, when Roger, now a captain, found himself amidst the action in the Arab Revolt. The worst, however, was yet to come.

In May 1940, while fighting the Germans with the British Expeditionary Force in the Battle of Belgium, he was knocked unconscious by an exploding shell. When he came round he was less than delighted to find that he was a Prisoner of War. Thus began a period of incarceration that would last five long years, and which for Roger there seemed no conceivable end in sight.

Vintage Roger is Roger Mortimer at his witty, irreverent best, exuding the charm and good humour that captured the nation's hearts in Dear Lupin and Dear Lumpy. Steadfastly optimistic and utterly captivating, these letters, written to his good friend Peggy Dunne from May 1940 to late 1944, paint a vivid portrait of life as a POW.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 192 pages
  • 140 x 220 x 22mm | 320g
  • Constable
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1472132246
  • 9781472132246
  • 56,778

Review quote

Full of [Mortimer's] trademark gallows humour and laconic self-deprecation * Daily Mail *
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About Roger Mortimer

Roger Mortimer was born in 1909 and educated at Eton and Sandhurst. In 1930 he was commissioned into the Coldstream Guards. He fought at Dunkirk in 1940, was captured and spent the remainder of the war as a POW. After resigning from the army in 1947, he became racing correspondent for The Sunday Times for almost thirty years. He wrote several classic books on racing including The History of the Derby. He met Cynthia Denison-Pender in 1947 and married the same year. They had two daughters: Jane and Louise, and one son, Charles. Roger died in 1991.
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