Vines and How to Grow Them; A Manual of Climbing Plants for Flower, Foliage and Fruit Effects, Both Ornamental and Useful, Including Those Shrubs and Similar Forms That May Be Used as Vines

Vines and How to Grow Them; A Manual of Climbing Plants for Flower, Foliage and Fruit Effects, Both Ornamental and Useful, Including Those Shrubs and Similar Forms That May Be Used as Vines

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ...it sounds, for the graceful little vine has a most inconvenient habit of refusing to grow, except in locations that it has itself chosen. Because of this difficulty attendant on transplanting it, the plant is less popular than its beauty deserves, except with those "May-flowering parties," which gather the wild flower by the armful, raise nothing with which to replace what they take, and are, thereby, rapidly assisting in the extermination of the delicate little native of our woods. Under satisfactory conditions, arbutus will grow very rapidly, and soon make a handsome dark-green mat. These conditions involve a well-drained soil, light in texture, and the entire absence of any "fussing." If you can supply these wants, and once get the plant started, leave it severely alone, for it will do more by itself than you can ever persuade it to do. A good trailer or ground cover for a sunny location is the partridge berry (Mitchella repens). This vine is very hardy, flowers in early spring, and makes, with its small leaves and loose, jagged style of growth, a very attractive show. If you should ask me, as a man once did, if I know of a plant that will grow where nothing else will, I would recommend, as I did to him, Pachysandra terminalis. That man's erstwhile bare yard is now a mass of the "vine with the iron constitution," and he has been supplying his neighbours with plants for some years. Pachysandra is especially desirable in waste, sandy places where the small, shiny leaves will soon carpet the ground, to remain a bright, cheerful colour from one year to the next. CHAPTER XIII Vines For Veranda Decoration Arranging colours--Hanging baskets--Veranda boxes--How to make movable screens and trellises--English ivy as a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236566688
  • 9781236566683