A Vindication of the University of Cambridge from the Reflections of Sir James Edward Smith Contained in 'Considerations Respecting Cambridge'. [With] Appendix

A Vindication of the University of Cambridge from the Reflections of Sir James Edward Smith Contained in 'Considerations Respecting Cambridge'. [With] Appendix

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1818 edition. Excerpt: ...and sweeping declaration.' A writer, who expected to gain any credit for such an assertion as the above, should have added 'to the best of my knowledge, '1 or 'as far as I have heard, ' or some other saving clause; without which it is obvious that, unless he had actuallyquestioned upon the subject every dignified clergyman in England (for all are either of Oxford or Cambridge), he ran the risk of seeing his assertion clash, as it does most outrageously, with matters of fact. I hope, however, that he does not mean to defend his sweeping declaration, by saying that the strong objections to his pretensions, which many of the dignified clergy do actually express, were not first started by themselves, but originated with others. Such an apology would be called prevarication, and would, after all, be irreconcilable to fact. In the latter clause, sweeping and outrageous as it seems, he has secured his retreat. 'No clergyman, ' he says, 'distinguished for literature or eminent acquirements, ' has started an objection to him: and who is made the judge of a clergyman's literary distinction and acquirements? Why, Sir James himself; who, as soon as any one objects to him, deprives him directly of all claim to either. But will the clergy or the public acquiesce in Sir James's decision on literary merits? Of this I am morally certain, that till he has produced some very different specimen of his own literary judgment and taste, than his Considerations respecting Cambridge afford, there is not one of us, who wli be mortified by his censure. Of those clergymen who have expressed, both in private and in public, a decided opinion against Sir James's admission into the University, there are several, whom the world has been pleased to think not entirely...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236952049
  • 9781236952042