A Vindication of the Church of Scotland; Occasioned by the Duke of Argyll's 'Essay on the Ecclesiastical History of Scotland' [Entitled Presbytery Examined]

A Vindication of the Church of Scotland; Occasioned by the Duke of Argyll's 'Essay on the Ecclesiastical History of Scotland' [Entitled Presbytery Examined]

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...form a 'christian church, and a christian commonwealth'--that the church, like every other society formed for lawful purposes, has the right of self-government, though not to the exclusion of the civil magistrate, who is entitled to interfere, even in its purely spiritual administration--that this right of self-government is not derived from Jesus Christ as its Head, and is not founded on scripture, but is natural and inherent, and is delegated by the christian people, the members of the church, to ministers and elders, their representatives. He thinks that the views of Knox aDd his colleagues on this subject were different from those of their successors--that the former realised the idea of a christian commonwealth, and that the opinions of Melville, Henderson, and others, and of the Free Church of Scotland, imply the assumption of a clerical and priestly authority, resembling, though perhaps imperfectly, the arrogant claims of the Romish hierarchy and the tractarians of the Church of England. One great objection--and it is a fatal objection--to the theory of Dr Arnold, is, that it is impracticable, even on the supposition that the rulers and other inhabitants of a country may be actuated by a pure faith, and imbued with the spirit of vital christianity--a supposition which will not be realised till millennial times. The things with which the Church and the State have to deal are so dissimilar that they cannot, without injury to both, become the subjects of one and the same administration. The Church is occupied with the conscience of men; its business is to inculcate a pure religious belief, and to promote and maintain pure morality. The State legislates and administers with reference to person and property, and the external conduct of men. The...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123661397X
  • 9781236613974