Vindication of the B

Vindication of the B

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...about the Beal Presence was taken out, probably in deference to the wishes of some who F at that time held Ubiquitarian views about the Sacred Humanity; but another Article was inserted--now Article XXIX.--declaring in its title in the most direct terms that the 'wicked... do not eat the Body of Christ in the use of the Supper.'1 1 We are aware of the efforts that have been made to give to these two Articles (XXVIII. and XXIX.) an interpretation consonant with belief in the Real Objective Presence. It has been urged (Forbes on the Thirty-nine Articles, in loc), that in Article XXVIII. the Body of Christ is said to be 'given, taken, and eaten, ' and stress has been laid on this triplet of terms. 'Taking ' and ' eating, ' it is said, being distinct words, must be meant to denote distinct actions, of which, since one, the 'eating, ' is through the exercise of faith, the other, 'taking, ' must denote an external act, and, being coupled with its correlative 'giving, ' be understood to declare an objective 'taking' of something objectively 'given, ' which can be nothing else than the true Body and Blood of Christ present on the altar. It has been also contended (by Dr. Pusey in the Eirenicon), as regards Article XXIX., that the phrase to 'partake of Christ' by general agreement denotes a beneficial eating of the sacramental food, so that it is quite consonant with Catholic doctrine to deny, as the Article does, such eating to the wicked. These ingenious interpretations of phrases which in their obvious sense are calculated to convey quite an opposite sense are too subtle to impress many minds. They do not, however, touch the argument advanced in the text. That interpretation of a formulary is to be preferred which, whilst fitting its words, accords...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236989945
  • 9781236989949