A View of the Relations of the Nervous System, in Health and in Disease, Containing Selections from the Dissertation to Which Was Adjudged the Jacksonian Prize for 1813, with Additional Remarks

A View of the Relations of the Nervous System, in Health and in Disease, Containing Selections from the Dissertation to Which Was Adjudged the Jacksonian Prize for 1813, with Additional Remarks

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1815 edition. Excerpt: ...is palpable, we cannot but remark this characteristic circumstance, namely, that the effects of such a condition of the nerve (like the condition itself) are permanent. Assuming therefore that we possess the sanction of data thus far, it remains to be examined, as the pathology of tic douloureux does not find its development in the changes of structure, in what other way the symptoms of the disease can take place? To enter fully into this discussion, would involve many speculative principles of physiology, which have never been glanced at in the scrutinies of processes. As a theme of disquisition so copious cannot here be engaged in, a few remarks only will be offered on the topics, and order, of the inquiry. The disease we are considering consists in an affection of the faculty of sensation. The origin of this affection is spontaneous, and may occur independent of any perceptible alteration of the material organs, with which it js allied: by what mode then does the affection of a faculty, which belongs to the nerves, commence? We perceive the possibility of two origins, which correspond with a double function; one belongs to the nerve, and the other to its centre. But that the disease we are considering is one which arises in the nerve, appears to be confirmed by this fact, namely, that the division of a trunk, will suspend the symptoms of the disease, although that trunk may give off branches, also susceptible of the disease, which are more contiguous to the centre of the system; or, in other words, if the communication of the affected branch (a point of origin) with the brain, be intercepted, the disease will not affect other branches, unless they are also become the seat of it. Df. Darwin has remarked, that the seat of the disease is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236895908
  • 9781236895905