View of the Present State of All the Empires, Kingdoms, States, and Republics in the Known World, and of the United States of America in Particular

View of the Present State of All the Empires, Kingdoms, States, and Republics in the Known World, and of the United States of America in Particular

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1801 edition. Excerpt: ...the many manfactures of articles of luxury established in France, would exceed the limits of diis book; it is sufficiently known, that France has long ago ta-ken the lead in fashions, -)-and has had Manufactures are more considerable in England than in France. 7"-""-jf f Fatliions (in dress) change oftencr in England than in France. 1HJ. had the-goo J fortune of seeing them imitated ants adopted by most other nations of Europe. ' This fortunate pre-eminence is a very great source of profits. In the year 1773 there were in France ijoo. "silkmills, 21,000 looms for silk stuffs, 12,000 for ribbands and lace, 20,000 for silk stockings and the different silk manufactures employed 2, coo, coo persons. ls a commercial state, France follows immediately after England and Holland. Its trade is carried on with all Europe; that branch of it which was carried on pubb'ckly with England was hitherto not ver-y considerable. It exported to England in the year 1785, goods to the value of 117,3661. sterling, and imported from England to the value of 358,2, (41. sterling. But the smuggling trade between both countries is can led on to a great amount. It was publickly stated in the House os Commons, that only 60,000 kegs of spirits paid the duties, and 3,000,000 kegs were smuggled; the greatest part of which were French spirits. The French have made themselves masters of the greatest sliare of the Levant trade; they export the produce of their manufactures, chiefly woollens, and West India goods, from Marseilles to Constantinople, Smyrna, Syria, and Egypt. They take, however, so large quantities of the produce of these countries in return, that they are obliged to pay a balance in ready money. The French enjoy some valuable commercial privileges...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 354 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 630g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236556461
  • 9781236556462