A View of the Moral State of Society at the Close of the Eighteenth Century; Much Enlarged, and Continued to the Commencement of the Year 1804

A View of the Moral State of Society at the Close of the Eighteenth Century; Much Enlarged, and Continued to the Commencement of the Year 1804 : With a Preface Addressed Particularly to the Higher Orders

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1804 edition. Excerpt: ...ine'orrup'tible by wealth, and invincible by danger-, _it-has been always deemed to shed a high lustre on the character in which it appeared; and, when displayed in the ex-' alted form of loyalty, it has justly been considered as cementing all the ties of society. This splendid and valuable virtue, after-being relaxed by the enervating softness of luxurious dissipation, isnow held forth to scorn by that new school of morality, which, under-the specious pretence of solicitude for general happiness and universal liberty, teaches its disciples to substitute vanity and egotism for every affection that can improve or adorn our nature.-See the lessons of-this school-exemplified in the treatment exE See this Prince, for several rnonths after his defeat _ at Culloden, in-the powerhof great numbers of wretchedly poor Highlanders, not one of whom could be tempted bythe splendid bait of thirty the everinfamous Drouet_--whose name can never be mentioned without_ indignation and horror. On that occasion, the utmost zeal was displayed, by all descriptions of persons, to sound the alarm, and to stop the flight of their lawful Sovereign. Nay, such was the tre-asonable ardour which had been inspired by revolutionary principles, thatagentleman, M. de Dampierre, who happened to be on theroad when this horrid transaction attracted his notice, was actually murdered by the mob of furies, who surrounded-the royal carriage, merely because he sought, unarmed, to approach their Majesties, and to testify, 'by his looks, his loyalty and his grief! But to bringthe comparison between ancient fidelity and modern revolutionary-treachery to a still narrower point. See the friend to flirt;/t-kind, la' Fayette, who, when he discovered the departure of.'-his.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236754859
  • 9781236754851