A View of the History of Great-Britain; During the Administration of Lord North to the Second Session of the Fifteenth Parliament

A View of the History of Great-Britain; During the Administration of Lord North to the Second Session of the Fifteenth Parliament

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1782 edition. Excerpt: ...but its manners seem to have remained uii corrupted, insomuch that in the course of eighteen years, it is said, that only one criminal has been executed in-the province. However we may abhor traitors, we cannot but admire such unexampled internal decorum! Although desection had now spread over the American contineut, yet two descriptions of men might have been expected to withstand the general contagion, at least utterly to renounce the idea of taking up arms against Great Britain, namely, the quakers from principles of religionand such military men who were natives of the British isles, but who had settled in America at the conclusion of the last war in considerable numbers: but the contrary proved to be the sact. Many of the younger quakers in Philadelphia formed themselves into volunteer companies, and the British officers officers forgetting that doctrine of submission and subordination which they had imbibed with their tactics, took an active part with the Americans, and rendered the most essential service to their cause, by forming their husbandmen into soldiers... - Congress now sought to procure arms and ammunition for the insurgents, and as a royal proclamation had been issued, prohibiting the exportation of such articles from Britain., the public magazines were forcibly seized upon in many places. Mills were constructed and manusactures established in Pennsylvania and Virginia, for making gunpowder, and American vessels visited the several European ports from Cadiz even to Hamburgh. This activity was unremitted, whilst the antipathy which subsisted between the King's troops at Boston and the provincials, was daily increasing, and foreboded speedy hostilities. Occasions for ikirmishes were frequent, but the Americans pretend, that...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236658817
  • 9781236658814