A Victorian Anthology, 1837-1895; Selections Illustrating the Editor's Critical Review of British Poetry in the Reign of Victoria Volume 1

A Victorian Anthology, 1837-1895; Selections Illustrating the Editor's Critical Review of British Poetry in the Reign of Victoria Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...she used to wear in her breast. It smelt so faint, and it smelt so sweet, It made me creep, and it made me cold! Like the scent that steals from the crum-bling sheet Where a mummy is half unroll'd. And I turn'd, and look'd. She was sitting there In a dim box, over the stage; and dress'd In that muslin dress with that full soft hair, And that jasmine in her breast 1 I was here; and she was there; And the glittering horseshoe curv'd between: --From my bride-betroth'd, with her raven hair, And her sumptuous scornful mien, To my early love, with her eyes downcast, And over her primrose face the shade (In short from the Future back to the Fast), There was but a step to be made. To my early love from my future bride One moment I look'd. Then I stole to the door, I traversal the passage; and down at her side I was sitting, a moment more. My thinking of her, or the music's strain, Or something which never will be ex prest, Had brought her back from the grave again, With the jasmine in her breast. She is not dead, and she is not wed 1 But she loves me now, and she lov'd me then! And the very first word that her sweet lips said, My heart grew youthful again. j The Marchioness there, of Carabas, She is wealthy, and young, and handsome still, And but for her... well, we 11 let that pass, She may marry whomever she will. But I will marry my own first love, With her primrose face: for old things are best, And the flower in her bosom, I prize it above The brooch in my lady's breast. The world is flll'd with folly and sin, And Love must cling where it can, I say: For Beauty is easy enough to win; But one is n't lov'd every day. And I think, in the lives of most women and men, There's a moment when all would go smooth and even, If only the dead could find out when...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 432 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 767g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236546075
  • 9781236546074