Venezuela-British Guiana Boundary Arbitration. the Printed Argument on Behalf of the United States of Venezuela Before the Tribunal of Arbitration Vol

Venezuela-British Guiana Boundary Arbitration. the Printed Argument on Behalf of the United States of Venezuela Before the Tribunal of Arbitration Vol

By (author) 

List price: US$22.35

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...of a government claiming and exercising jurisdiction in that behalf" (B. C., p. 149). This is to say that the discoverer's title is not perfected until he has brought into use the resources of the whole territory discovered, and has subjected its savage inhabitants to his control. Upon this, we remark, in passing, first, that it is not a correct statement of the law; second, that if it were it would involve a very great extension of "the reasonable period "; and, third, that it will hardly be claimed that a less strict rule must be applied to the second comer. This last difficulty Great Britain has not failed to observe. If the rule were to be applied to the Dutch in all its strictness, it was obvious to the compilers of the British Case that the Dutch possessions in Guiana would be very limited; and so we find some labored attempts to introduce amelioratious of its strictness, adapted to British needs. Thus it is said (p. 155), that while settlement and cultivation are always present in effective occupation, "of course the area occupied will not be confined to the actual sites appropriated for residence or cultivation "; and a quotation from Field, used approvingly, allows that an "effective control" of a region raises a legal presumption of occupation--effective occupation, of course--and this with or without the use of its resources. Again, it is said that the assertion and maintenance of an exclusive right to trade "in any specific area, surrounding its settle-rneuts," is '; effective control." And if the right to trade is used (we suppose a use is implied), though it be the merest and most primitive barter of beads for skins, in a land capable of producing enormous crops of the best cereals to feed a hungry world, or of producing the precious...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 134 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236674766
  • 9781236674760