The Value of Humanistic, Particularly Classical, Studies as a Preparation for the Study of Theology, from the Point of View of the Profession

The Value of Humanistic, Particularly Classical, Studies as a Preparation for the Study of Theology, from the Point of View of the Profession : A Symposium, from the Proceedings of the Classical Conference Held at Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 1, 1908

By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 4 business days
When will my order arrive?

Not expected to be delivered to the United States by Christmas Not expected to be delivered to the United States by Christmas

Description

Excerpt from The Value of Humanistic, Particularly Classical, Studies as a Preparation for the Study of Theology, From the Point of View of the Profession: A Symposium, From the Proceedings of the Classical Conference Held at Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 1, 1908 It is in the light of this whole view Of the ministry and Of its preparation that I must approach the specific task which your committee has assigned to me. What place, then, shall the study of Greek and Latin occupy in the preparation for the ministry? First as to Greek. The Christian religion not merely arose out of the Hebrew religion (and therefore every theological student ought to wish to know a little Hebrew), but in a world whose intellectual life was deeply saturated with the influences of the Greek language and literature. Greek, in fact, was the lingua franca of the world at that time, and hence we find that the writ ings of the New Testament are all preserved to us in that lan guage. Traditions that one or more originally existed in Aramaic are probably true, but the originals are entirely lost, so necessary was it that if they were to gain permanent place and influence they should be promptly translated and circulated as Greek docu ments. Even those apostolic letters which were addressed to the church in Rome itself and to that other church' in the Roman colony of Philippi were in the Greek language. It is further to be noted that early Christian literature emanating from the city of Rome was not in Latin, but in Greek - as witness the Epistle of the Roman Clement. It has on apparently good grounds been concluded that down to the latter half of the second century the language used in the life and worship Of the Christian church at Rome was not Latin, but Greek. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 3mm | 86g
  • Forgotten Books
  • United States
  • English
  • , black & white illustrations
  • 0243301197
  • 9780243301195