Uterine Diseases and Displacements; A Practical Treatise on the Various Diseases, Malpositions, and Structural Derangements of the Uterus and Its Appendages

Uterine Diseases and Displacements; A Practical Treatise on the Various Diseases, Malpositions, and Structural Derangements of the Uterus and Its Appendages

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ...by means of the bougie, to the cervix, and applied to the center of the part comprised within the speculum. With the long forceps, cotton is placed carefully all round the spot on which the caustic paste is applied, so as completely to protect the neighboring parts; and the bougie having been withdrawn, the speculum is two thirds filled with cotton or lint, which is firmly pressed against the uterine neck. The speculum is then slowly extracted, the cotton which fills it being at the same time forcibly pushed back in the vagina, with the forceps, as the speculum is withdrawn, so that the vagina remains thoroughly plugged. If this be carefully done, the caustic can not fuse and injure the parieties of the vagina. In about fifteen or twenty minutes the cotton or lint must be carefully withdrawn by means of a bivalve speculum gradually introduced, and an eschar of the size of a shilling, or rather larger, will be found where the caustic was applied. The vagina should then be washed out with a little tepid water, complete rest in bed enjoined, and emollient injections warm water is all-suflicient employed until the separation of the eschar, which takes place from the fifth to the eighth day." Dr. Bennett, however, rejects the above plan, for the very good and suificient reason that he has found a better one. His method of using the potassa cum calce is certainly more simple, and probably less liable to accidents. He says: "For the last two years I have not once used either the Vienna paste or the pure hydrate of potassa. I now always substitute cylinders of potassa cum calce, which, with the assistance of Mr. Senior, of Oxford Street, I have succeeded in obtaining similar to those of nitrate of silver in ordinary use. M. Filhos, of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236801989
  • 9781236801982