Useful Birds and Their Protection; Containing Brief Descriptions of the More Common and Useful Species of Massachusetts, with Accounts of Their Food Habits, and a Chapter on the Means of Attracting and Protecting Birds

Useful Birds and Their Protection; Containing Brief Descriptions of the More Common and Useful Species of Massachusetts, with Accounts of Their Food Habits, and a Chapter on the Means of Attracting and Protecting Birds

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...counties. Red-eyed Vireo. Vireosylva olivacea. Length.--About six inches Adult.--Upper parts grayish olive-green, changing to gray on the crown; a dark stripe on either side of the crown; a light stripe over eye, and a dark streak from hill through eye; under parts grayish-white, deepening to pale olive-yellow on the Hanks; iris ruby-red. Xest.--A pensile cup; usually hung by its upper edge from a fork, four to twenty-live feet from the ground. f'ggn'--White, spotted with dark brown at the larger end. Season.--May to September. The Red-eyed Vireo, although not so abundant as the Robin, is one of the most common and widely distributed summer birds. It breeds throughout the State. It is very devoted to its eggs and young, and sits very closely on the nest. The mother bird will often allow a person to walk by within arm's length while she remains quietly sitting. The parent birds feed and protect their young for a long time after they leave the nest. This Vireo sleeps very soundly; soon after sunset and before the shades of night have fallen the mother bird on her nest tucks her head under her wing, and is sometimes so oblivious to the world that she mav be approached and taken in the hand. The Redeve is found wherever there are groups of deciduous trees, or woodlands and thickets. Its movements as it slips about among the branches are rather deliberate. It sings continuallv, but the song is intermittent, as if the bird were singing incidentally as a pastime, like a boy whistling at his work. The song is composed of phrases of a few syllables each, and the manner of its delivery, with many rising and some falling inflections and frequent pauses, led Wilson Flagg to name the bird the 'preacher.' Many years ago I learned that the preacher had other...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236523555
  • 9781236523556