Us

Us

3.66 (37,636 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

David Nicholls brings to bear all the wit and intelligence that graced ONE DAY in this brilliant, bittersweet novel about love and family, husbands and wives, parents and children. Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2014.

'I was looking forward to us growing old together. Me and you, growing old and dying together.'

'Douglas, who in their right mind would look forward to that?'

Douglas Petersen understands his wife's need to 'rediscover herself' now that their son is leaving home.

He just thought they'd be doing their rediscovering together.

So when Connie announces that she will be leaving, too, he resolves to make their last family holiday into the trip of a lifetime: one that will draw the three of them closer, and win the respect of his son. One that will make Connie fall in love with him all over again.

The hotels are booked, the tickets bought, the itinerary planned and printed.

What could possibly go wrong?
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Product details

  • Paperback | 416 pages
  • 157 x 233 x 22mm | 540g
  • Hodder & Stoughton Ltd
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Maps and Line Drawings
  • 0340897007
  • 9780340897003
  • 13,756

Review Text

I was having to ration myself for fear of coming to the end too soon. Mail on Sunday
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Review quote

As he proved in One Day, Nicholls is brilliant at picking apart modern life with all its hopes, disillusionments and regrets, and marrying it to a gently heartbreaking narrative. * Observer * This very funny, wise and bittersweet novel was in my view even more enjoyable than Nicholls' previous bestseller One Day. * Daily Express * US is a perfect book. * Independent * The kind of book that reminds us what it means to be alive. * Good Housekeeping * I was having to ration myself for fear of coming to the end too soon. * Mail on Sunday *
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About David Nicholls

David Nicholls is the bestselling author of US, ONE DAY, STARTER FOR TEN and THE UNDERSTUDY. His novels have sold over 8 million copies worldwide and are published in forty languages. David's fifth novel, SWEET SORROW, will be published by Hodder in July 2019.

David trained as an actor before making the switch to writing. He is an award-winning screenwriter, with TV credits including the third series of Cold Feet, a much-praised modern version of Much Ado About Nothing, The 7.39 and an adaptation of Tess of the D'Urbervilles. David wrote the screenplays for Great Expectations (2012) and Far from the Madding Crowd (2015, starring Carey Mulligan). He has twice been BAFTA nominated and his recent adaptation of Patrick Melrose from the novels by Edward St Aubyn won him an Emmy nomination.

His bestselling first novel, STARTER FOR TEN, was selected for the Richard and Judy Book Club in 2004, and in 2006 David went on to write the screenplay of the film version.

His third novel, ONE DAY, was published in 2009 to extraordinary critical acclaim, and stayed in the Sunday Times top ten bestseller list for ten weeks on publication. ONE DAY won the 2010 Galaxy Book of the Year Award.

David's fourth novel, US, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2014 and was another no. 1 Sunday Times bestseller. In 2014, he was named Author of the Year at the National Book Awards.
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Rating details

37,636 ratings
3.66 out of 5 stars
5 20% (7,359)
4 41% (15,297)
3 29% (10,998)
2 8% (2,986)
1 3% (996)

Our customer reviews

Us is the fourth novel by British author, screenwriter, and actor, David Nicholls. With his seventeen-year-old son, Albie soon to head off to college to study photography, Douglas Petersen is looking forward to growing old with his beloved, beautiful and artistic wife of some twenty years, Connie. Unfortunately, Connie has other plans, intending to "rediscover herself" without Douglas, something that hits him hard ("It was like trying to go about my business with an axe embedded in my skull"). But before that happens, they have a final summer holiday to share: their Grand Tour of Europe, which will take in as much art and culture as they can cram into a month, a holiday meticulously planned by Douglas, a biochemist whose appreciation of art has been taught to him by Connie. Douglas is hoping this wonderful vacation can repair his relationship with his son, remind Connie of all that was so great about their marriage and thus change her mind about leaving him. The narrative alternates between the vacation and the memories of life from when Douglas first met and fell in love with Connie. Love, before Connie (b.c.), had been �??�?�¢??a condition whose symptoms were insomnia, dizziness and confusion followed by depression and a broken heart�??�?�¢??. After Connie (a.c.), life was altogether better: "I was familiar with the notion of alternative realities, but was not used to occupying the one I liked best." As the holiday progresses (not quite according to plan), he reviews in his mind past incidents of family life, and in retrospect, develops an uncomfortable insight into his words and deeds, an insight that was, unfortunately, lacking at the time. He begins to realise that his "huge amount of care, an ocean of it" was perceived by others as narrow-mindedness, conservatism or caution; he begins to understand Connie's accusation that "you can really suck the joy out of pretty much anything these days, can't you?" This novel is populated by characters that will feel familiar: most of us know a Douglas, well-meaning but almost completely incapable of spontaneity; Connie, beautiful, enigmatic and charming; Albie, filled with teenaged scorn for adult conservatism; the Petersen parents, repressed and disapproving ("Alcohol loosened inhibitions, and inhibitions were worn tight here"); Kat, rebellious and determined to shock. The plot is original and certainly takes a few unanticipated turns, a bit like the Petersen's vacation: buskers, angry bikers, Carabinieri, an Amsterdam prostitute, undersized Speedos, a night in a jail cell and jellyfish were not expected to feature. Nicholls gives the reader words of wisdom that elicit nodding agreement, lines that will cause smiles, groans and, in fact lots of laugh-out-loud moments, but he also causes the eyes to well up on several occasions. Nicholls treats the reader to some marvellous turns of phrase: "I had sweated feverishly in the night, the bedding now damp enough to propagate cress" and "together we had the grace of a three-legged dog, hobbling from place to place" are just two examples. Another brilliant Nicholls offering! With thanks to TheReadingRoom and Hachette for my copy to read and reviewshow more
by Marianne Vincent
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